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Digital Marketing in an Unpredictable VUCA World: PPC Town Hall 27

If you’ve been watching the news over the last couple of years, you could be forgiven for thinking we live in a weird timeline where dreary writers like Edgar Allan Poe and Ray Bradbury reigned supreme.

Between climate change, terrorism, economic struggle, and the health crisis of 2020, this year has embodied the term VUCA — volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity. Yet this is the world we live in, and if digital marketers want to continue to have a place in it, we have to learn how to adapt our tactics and messaging to this reality.

So this week on Episode 27 of PPC Town Hall, I wanted to bring in the authors of the report “Digital Marketing in a VUCA World” to share some of their insights from the research they conducted and to discuss what the roadmap for the future could look like.

Our panelists for the week:

As always, you can view this week’s episode of PPC Town Hall embedded below, or click here to browse all our episodes. In the meantime, here are some of the insights from this week’s PPC Town Hall on how to do digital marketing in an unpredictable VUCA world.

1. What happens when agencies lose large amounts of revenue overnight

Anders: We asked 20 agencies that participated in the survey, “How bad were you hit?” About 15% said ‘no change’; a huge chunk — about 50% of respondents — said between 10-40% reduction in media spend; and a fairly large percentage saying 40-60% reduction.

When we’re looking at agencies having 40% of their media spend disappear, and as we know, a lot of the economic models are tied in some way to spend. Very few are on a retainer or consultancy basis. So this means they lose a lot of money and activity, and the rest of the activity had to be changed. Everybody’s panicking, so what do you do?

Lukas: It’s actually been the case in some instances that the agency-client relationship has ended because of volatility. Bearing in mind that the vast majority of agencies — particularly the bigger ones in the UK — have very diverse clients in their portfolios, so that’s why the impact was mostly in the 40-60% range.

But I definitely know of instances where clients have stopped their relationship with an agency because they were the most hit — tourism, hotels, and some retail as well. But other parts of retail, especially direct-to-consumer, actually thrived during this time.

2. If you put the wrong data in, the wrong prediction comes out

Anders: When we talk about volatility and VUCA, yes there’s health crises and lockdowns; but there’s also terrorism and the end of cookies. The direct impact is more easily measurable on this year’s health crisis because it’s such an abrupt change.

Over the past 2 years, we saw people adopt automated or machine-based bidding massively. We also observed that agencies used dedicated data analysts in fewer cases than they did before. This surprised us.

Lukas: It feels like the outcome was two sides of the same coin. On the one hand, there is less involvement from data analysts because there’s more reliance on AI. On the other hand, it’s not about the position of the analyst but the insight into performance is placed on marketers’ shoulders.

So where you’d previously have a data analyst to support you with looking at trends and performance, it’s almost a standard part of the marketer’s job instead of focusing on platform and creatives.

3. Data is the new oil

Anders: Can you extract more value from your data than if you give it to a platform? It’s a question of who controls it and whether you should give it away to a third party like Google or Amazon.

We think it’s very important to start controlling and protecting your own data. It doesn’t mean you shouldn’t make it flow; flowing data across platforms is extremely important to get better insights. But you need to consider each time you do that: what are you using, what are you giving away, and is there anything you can keep instead of letting someone else monetize it?

4. The connection between automation and who’s deploying it

Lukas: For me, the whole idea of paid search until now is its transparency. You can track everything down to each penny you spend and be able to show results. This is now changing the fundamentals of what paid search is for me, because I can’t explain everything (with less data).

5. How people can use automated bidding more effectively

Lukas: I personally see a huge degree of complacency when it comes to automated bidding, especially, in a lot of agencies. You’ll find that 90% of the time, you can set the AI to do your bidding for you and it’ll deliver decent performance.

But it’s that 10% of the time where something goes wrong, or when you have a promotion that suddenly skews the data — and suddenly, you have an impulse that the tool cannot account for and everything falls apart.

I even feel with some of the ways platforms sell automated bidding, like recommending not to touch things for 2 weeks to let the machines learn, you should never be in a position where you can’t change settings.

6. Preparing for the end of cookies

Anders: Will remarketing be in trouble as we see fewer and fewer cookies? Yes. Hopefully, the bad practices will die off and there’ll be some intelligent use of user data.

So start building direct relationships with your users, like email or another channel where you own that user data. If you only have access to your customers and clients via platforms or audiences, you’re probably going to lose a lot of that access. So start building that proprietary database today.

Conclusion

As I mentioned this week on PPC Town Hall, the role of the PPC manager is changing from being in the middle of account performance to managing the periphery (read my full thoughts on the topic in my post for Search Engine Journal).

But as we look to evolve our roles, we also have to remain aware of what’s happening in the wider world. From the geopolitical to the ecological, events transpire daily that impact the health of the digital marketing space… paid search included.

That’s why spaces of learning (like PPC Town Hall) will only become more important in the coming months and years. So sign up for our mailing list (and tell your PPC peers) to get notified of all our events in advance and early access to some of our upcoming resources!

Is there something on your mind? Do you have a topic you’d like us to cover on PPC Town Hall? Write to support@optmyzr.com and tell us about it, and we’ll try our best to address your concerns.

Take Control of Geo Bid Adjustments and Placements with Optmyzr

Imagine if your bank let you transfer money to people but made it difficult to decide who receives your transfers. Pretty silly, right?

Despite the objections of every advertiser ever, it’s still not easy to tune many aspects of your campaigns in Google Ads. So it was pretty much second nature that we stepped up to make the experience better for our customers.

Bid adjustments — using audience analytics and insights to regulate ad performance — are invaluable. But you can’t overlook the time-consuming chore that is bid management through Google’s engine. The challenge is even greater when it comes to setting placements, especially the ever-popular ‘exclude all mobile apps’ preference.

Those are the two key areas of our recent Rule Engine updates designed to help account managers and PPC strategists speed things up. Let’s take a look at what’s new, where to find the updates, and how you can use them.

New in Geo Bid Adjustment and Placements

Simply put, these updates take the form of instant strategies in the Rule Engine, Optmyzr’s logic-driven rule builder that uses ‘if-then’ statements to get your account to take a specific action when certain conditions are met.

These new strategies are:

While our instant strategies come with recommended settings, they can be further customized and automated using your own preferences. If you’re familiar with how the Rule Engine works, you can create your own geo bid adjustment and placement strategies from scratch — all the components are there.

Other Geo Bid Adjustment and Placement Features

The Geo Bid Adjustments tool analyzes campaign performance in different locations and makes recommendations for bid adjustments. You can implement adjustments at the country, region, city, and zip/pin code level. This tool also lets you discover new cities based on traffic and target them according to ROAS or CPA.

With Placements Exclusion, you can customize your strategy to prevent showcasing your ads at random in the Google Display Network. No more manually excluding apps one by one. Bypass the limits of Google Ads and remove your ads from showing via the entire mobile apps category.

Optmyzr Tip: Stop wasting money on bids and sites that don’t yield profit or returns. These tools give you more granular control over campaign behavior based on geolocations and ad placement. You can use a mix of custom and instant strategies in the Rule Engine to improve your ad performance, or use these tools for research before you even build and run a campaign.

Use Cases for Geo Bid Adjustments 

1. Account for holidays or other closures.

Depending on your industry and location, some events lead to virtually zero-sale days with customers focused on things other than shopping. With Geo Bid Adjustments, you can now mark those locations and lower your bid to account for those lulls in activity. Customize the bids to -90% to keep the campaign running but with reduced ad spend.

2. Track cities with wasted ad spend.

Throughout your campaign, you might find some locations don’t provide enough conversions for the number of clicks they show for. These might be areas where the cost per conversion is higher than the campaign average, resulting in potentially wasted spend. Now you can just use the ‘Find Expensive Cities’ instant strategy in Rule Engine, and customize your initial campaign actions to exclude these cities or create bid adjustments for those locations. Or, you can use the strategy as an alert system to be notified of locations that put out a higher CPA.

3. Discover potential target locations.

Due to erratic lockdowns and reopenings across the globe, businesses might start receiving traffic from newer locations where they didn’t drive sales in the past. You need a system to account for any possible new traffic. With the ‘Find New Cities’ strategy, you can find locations that showed traffic in the last 14 days but not before. Run this strategy twice a month to track any new traffic and find new areas of interest.

Use Cases for Display Placements

1. Target placements with a specific bid.

While running a Display campaign without any targeted placements, you’ll see that the engine will automatically place you where it thinks your ad may perform best based on past data. With the Display Placements Exclusion tool, you can identify sites (or placements) where you’re doing well and customize your strategies to target these in future campaigns.

2. Bid lower for placements with bad ROAS or CPA.

Most ad placements on mobile devices happen below the fold, and the chances that people scroll down to even see to your ads are extremely thin. Your placements might not have enough viewability and will therefore have poor ROAS or CPA. With this same tool, you can see suggestions for such weak placements and lower your bid on them to prevent spending on low-converting traffic.

3. Exclude placements on all apps or a specific operating system.

While some apps are great to advertise on, others tend to have an audience who won’t benefit from your ad at all. With the Placements Exclusion instant strategy, you can stop your ads from showing on all mobile apps and even certain operating systems.

Conclusion

Between our new Rule Engine strategies and existing tools, Optmyzr allows you to truly control and optimize your campaigns beyond what Google’s automated rules will enable. This makes search marketers the final authority, and allows you to layer multiple powerful automations to support your campaigns efficiently.

Analyze data based on preferred date ranges and other metrics to arrive at what’s best for your business, and focus your time on building excellent strategies rather than performing repetitive tasks.

Save time, save ad spend, and take control back from Google.

Try out these and all our other tools for 14 days at absolutely no risk with our free trial. No credit card required!

How to Start Selling the Easy Way On Google Shopping

Earlier this year, Google made an announcement that changed the way advertisers perceived Shopping campaigns. By making Google Shopping listings free, the world’s largest advertising network forced everyone selling tangible products to rethink their PPC strategies.

Suddenly, this component of the Google advertising network became much more attractive.

At first, brands and PPC marketers were captivated by the prospect of free ad space. Once the initial hype faded, it became clear that only a portion of Google Shopping listings would be made free and that certain conditions had to be met.

To take advantage of these free listings, advertisers need to have active Google Merchant Center accounts and enable their products to show on all surfaces including Google Images, the Google Shopping tab, Google Lens, and Google Search.

As of late May, our conversations with experts like Kirk Williams of Zato Marketing revealed that an average of 5-6% of Google Shopping listings were made complementary.

But that’s not the only reason it makes sense to give your products Google Shopping visibility.

If like many other brands, your business or client are just starting to get involved in building Google Shopping campaigns, this article will help you figure out how to sell on Google Shopping.

In this article, we’ll explore:

How to take advantage of Google Shopping listings

Google Shopping allows advertisers to promote physical, shippable products with a greater amount of visual appeal. Consumers searching for ‘blue shoes’ or ‘leather couch’ can view and explore a range of product listings that match closely with what they’re looking for.

Google Shopping campaigns come in two varieties: Standard and Smart.

Image sourced from versafeed.com

Standard campaigns are built manually to deliver on highly strategic goals. These require some understanding of product groups, campaign structures, and other campaign components in order to achieve a specific goal, such as a target ROAS.

Smart campaigns on Google Shopping reduce the entry barrier by using machine learning and automation to speed up the process. This makes them ideal for small businesses with limited budgets, or advertisers who don’t have the time to build out Standard campaigns.

While Standard campaigns afford greater control over location targeting, negative keywords, custom scheduling, and network placement; Smart campaigns require historical data but will determine placement and other parameters for you based on past performance of other campaigns.

Google Shopping: A proven channel for product visibility

Google Shopping campaigns have always been considered a core part of the PPC marketer’s toolbox. They carry a visual component, which has proven to be more attractive than plain text when products are involved.

Here are four more reasons why Google Shopping is a proven way to give your products the visibility they need, especially with the current economic landscape in mind.

How to sell on Google Shopping the easy way

Google Shopping campaigns can be highly valuable if your business calls for them. But it can be confusing and tricky to build them out if you don’t know exactly what you’re doing. Moreover, creating splits (e.g. by brand or category) takes a significant amount of time when done manually — and leaves you prone to human error.

Optmyzr’s tools for Google Shopping cover the full life cycle, allowing you to create campaigns and set structures from scratch. Use us to do the heavy lifting and help you create the campaign structures you want, quickly and without error.

With Optmytzr guiding you step by step, you can create both Standard and Smart Google Shopping campaigns and ad groups in just a few clicks.

Campaign Builder 2.0

Campaign Builder 2.0 is Optmyzr’s tool to build Standard and Smart Google Shopping campaigns from scratch. Anyone can link a spreadsheet or Google Merchant Center feed to get started in minutes.

Product Group Refresher 2.0

Product Group Refresher 2.0 optimizes existing Google Shopping campaigns by adding new products and product groups based on existing campaign structures. It looks at your current campaign structures and syncs with the feed to accurately reflect your inventory.

Machine learning provides suggestions, and you can even automate the entire process. For example, when new products are added to the inventory feed, Optmyzr can automatically create new product groups for them.

Manage Shopping Bids

This optimization identifies high-performing product groups, allowing you to raise bids for product groups that are driving results. It also shows which product groups are underperforming or failing, letting you lower bids for them.

By nature, this tool only supports Standard Google Shopping campaigns.

Shopping Analysis

One of our most popular Insight tools, Shopping Analysis helps Optmyzr users understand how their products are performing irrespective of structure. Use it to aggregate data and determine performance based on a number of different attributes.

Aggregate data by price to see the performance and ROAS that products at different price points drive. Or if you’re selling shoes, easily see which sizes are more popular and sell more, or which ones aren’t in demand so you can fine-tune procurement.

Shopping Analysis works with both Standard and Smart Google Shopping campaigns. With the former, you can use this aggregate data to change bids using the Attribute Bidder. For Smart Shopping, you can see which products are selling better — an insight that’s not easy to obtain in Google Ads.

Conclusion

While it’s admirable that Google is thinking of advertisers and supporting them with some complementary Shopping listings, there’s greater value to be experienced than just a couple of freebies.

Unlike services, products have shape and form — and people love to see what they’re buying before they make a purchase. Google Shopping campaigns enable you to do this while expanding your reach, allowing small businesses to flourish and hobbyists to turn passion into profession.

To learn more about how we can help you build and optimize Google Shopping campaigns with minimal time sink, write to us at support@optymzr.com or sign up to try Optmyzr free of cost.

How to Scale Your PPC Budget While Maintaining ROAS

Anyone who’s ever done strength training knows the challenge of overcoming a plateau. Once your body gets used to a certain regimen, it’s important to scale up your activity level — but without hurting yourself by doing too much too soon.

The same logic applies to scaling your PPC budget.

When your account is already performing well and receives a significant financial boost (like the one many brands will experience as we come out of the COVID-19 pandemic), it can be difficult to spend more while maintaining the same level of ROAS or CPA.

While it’s fairly simple, it certainly isn’t easy.

With that being said, here are some tips to help you to take greater control of your PPC budget without compromising on ROAS and CPA goals.

Manage your budgets better

If it sounds straightforward, that’s because it is. Effective budget scaling begins with making your marketing dollars work more efficiently, and a better understanding of where your account is experiencing the greatest returns and wastage.

Fortunately, Optmyzr gives you the tools to get where you need to go.

Optmyzr’s Spend Projection tool uses historical data to predict future spend.

If your current campaign setup and traffic don’t exhaust your budget, there are additional steps you can take.

Grow your account

Given the way your current campaigns are set up, you may not have significant opportunity to grow your account traffic. In this case, you’ll need to grow your account.

You can achieve this with a two-pronged approach.

1. Hone more keyword opportunities

Reviewing search terms with good performance can open up a world of possibilities that you may have neglected or been unaware of. Optmyzr lets you do this with a number of one-click optimizations.

Use the Keyword Lasso tool to discover new opportunities to fully utilize your budget.

2. Promote existing keywords, ad groups and campaigns

Sometimes, it’s not a question of looking for new opportunities, but optimizing the ones you’re already capitalizing on to yield better results. We can help you take performing campaigns up a notch without needing to do the heavy lifting yourself.

The Optimize Target CPA & ROAS tool helps increase conversions with automated bidding.

The importance of risk mitigation

At Optmyzr, we believe risk mitigation is a vital component of any evolving PPC strategy. So while you explore these options to expand your account and promote existing inventory, be sure to have a safety net in place.

Maintain and monitor ROAS performance

Once you have the different pieces in place, it’s important to keep a regular eye on things. As humans, we can provide context that machines don’t have and increase the chances of a favorable outcome.

Conclusion

PPC strategy is never as easy as we’d like it to be, and challenges like the ongoing pandemic add variables that can affect performance overnight.

At a time when current data is volatile and historical data is unreliable, this ‘human context’ is more critical than ever to getting the most out of machine learning.

By regularly checking in on your automations, you’ll be able to exert greater influence over how and where your marketing dollars are channeled, giving you a better chance of seeing the results your brand is looking for.

How to See the New Queries That Now Trigger Your Ad

In the past few weeks, search behavior – much like the rest of the world – has turned upside down in an unexpected and unprecedented manner. Whereas airlines might have normally seen a lot of searches related to flights for summer vacations, now they’re seeing entirely new search terms related to cancelations and COVID-19.

With the influx of never-before seen queries, we added a new Rule Engine strategy (recipe) to help you stay on top of things. It finds queries (search terms) that had no impressions 2 weeks ago, but which have had impressions in the past week. These are considered ‘new queries’ for your account. By reviewing them periodically, you can see if shifts in user behavior are impacting your account negatively with an influx of searches you’d rather not pay for.

This new strategy is also rather important given that exact match keywords can now be expanded by Google to include searches with a similar meaning. We don’t know exactly how Google defines ‘same meaning’ so it’s more important than ever to monitor search terms for your account.

It’s easy for our customers with access to Rule Engine to try this new strategy.

Step 1: Go to Rule Engine and add a new Instant Recipe

Step 2: Preview results for the ‘New Search Queries’ recipe

Step 3: Look at the new search queries for your account.

Step 4: Customize the results by setting a different impression threshold.

Managing AdWords AND Bing Ads? New Functionality Streamlines Both

Anyone who has worked with Optmyzr knows our innovative platform has greatly streamlined and automated Pay-Per-Click campaign management for Google AdWords. Many marketers who work with our innovative PPC Management Software have seen significant improvements in campaign performance and agency profitability.

We now offer much of that same automation to support Bing Ads management for agency and in-house marketers alike. PPC pros can tap the power of machine learning and artificial intelligence to help make Bing Ads accounts more effective and profitable – much the same way they use Optmyzr for AdWords.

Specific features rolled out for Bing Ad management include an intuitive UI that brings together key PPC management tools in one package:

  • Budget and KPI monitoring: Marketers have access to powerful visualizations and alerts to track and manage against key metrics, such as conversions, return on ad spend (ROAS) and cost per conversion.
  • Ability to find new keywords and create single keyword ad groups (SKAGS): Optmyzr’s intuitive Keyword Lasso tool allows One-Click Optimization™, which automates analysis of search terms and identifies higher performing search queries. Previously only available to support AdWords accounts, the Keyword Lasso now allows the same ability to identify optimal keywords and create new ad groups that support SKAG ad group structures.
  • New ad creation in A/B testing: Optmyzr now extends ad creation and A/B testing for Bing Ads management. Marketers benefit from automated suggestions for ad content based on what has worked in campaigns.
  • Hour-of-week performance optimization: A new Hour of Week Bidder for Bing gives PPC pros recommended hourly bid adjustments, based on conversion and cost goals as well as other variables. Ad schedules can be changed in bulk, giving marketers greater ability to turn off ads when they are not needed.
  • Search term N-grams for Bing: This tool allows marketers to gain quick insight into long-tail search behaviors, helping to minimize wasted spend and improve results by unearthing words (N-grams) that lead to wasted spend.
  • Landing page analysis: PPC pros can now benefit from aggregated performance data for landing pages across Bing campaigns. This helps understand which pages perform well and gives insight into improvements that can be made to landing pages that have low conversion rates.
  • Geo HeatMap analysis: Optmyzr now brings powerful visualizations of Bing Ads geo data via an interactive heatmap. Marketers can tap this information to analyze traffic and conversions based on location, allowing more strategic budget allocation right down to the city level.
  • The above mentioned features are available to try out in Optmyzr. Use this link to access tools for Bing Ads accounts.

    Our developers have enhanced marketers’ abilities to optimize Google AdWords campaigns over the last several years. Of course, Google still dominates the PPC landscape, but Bing has gained market share for six consecutive years. As a result, many marketers now manage similar campaigns across both platforms. Our objective is to help marketers improve efficiency and profitability of their overall PPC initiatives.�

    Stay tuned for additional Bing-specific functionality as we move through 2018. We are working on additional ways marketers can extend instant optimizations and gain quick insights into their PPC programs.�

    5 Simple Ways To Increase Your Quality Score

    Quality score is like an onion, or a parfait if you’re Donkey from Shrek, because well, everybody likes a parfait.� Whether you prefer one analogy or the other, there’s always more to your quality score than meets the eye. On the surface, we all know what quality score is and why it’s important. So, why don’t we pay more attention to it? Most likely because it’s easy to see a 1-10 score and take it at face value. That’s merely the first layer, however, it’s beneficial to dig deeper and do more. Sure, we may tweak our campaigns a bit to increase quality score but how many of us are familiar with what it takes to truly improve the quality score? Moreover, why is quality score so important?

    Like much of Google (search algorithm anybody?) the available information is somewhat vague about how a quality score number is achieved.

    This is how Google defines it:

    Quality Score is an estimate of the quality of your ads, keywords, and landing pages. Higher quality ads can lead to lower prices and better ad positions.

    Google goes on to tell us that the 3 components of the quality score are:

    Yes, that’s a bit oversimplified, but it does give us a place to start. First off, we know that quality score is important because a better score can lead to higher ad ranks and lower per click costs. Who doesn’t want that?

    To confuse matters more, Google then goes on to tell us that the 1-10 quality score given, which is just an aggregated estimate, isn’t even used at the time of the auction to determine ad rank. Why? Because it is� just an estimate after all.

    What do they use then? I’ll let Google tell you:

    Real-time, auction-specific quality calculations of expected clickthrough rate, ad relevance, and landing page experience are used to calculate Ad Rank at auction time. These factors, which are based on things known only at the time of the auction, can heavily influence the quality of the user’s experience.

    So, while we may not know the exact score at the time of each auction, we do have a pretty good idea of the quality by looking at the quality score we do have. Yes, I agree, it would be better to have a deeper level of insight into why your score may not be where you want it but Google has, in recent weeks, added more to the standard 1-10 quality score.

    If you haven’t noticed it yet you can now also see

    You also have access to a history for each keyword that will let you know if you’ve improved or not. While it is nice that these are now available, seeing only average, above average and below average can you leave you wanting but at least it’s a step in the right direction.

    This is why we’ve been using Optmyzr’s Quality Score Tracker. Not only does it show us the data that Adwords gives us for quality score, it goes above and beyond with great visuals while also aggregating account, campaign, and ad group quality score data. No need for me to go into the differences here, Frederick Vallaeys has already done that by giving us Five Ways That Optmyzr Tracks Quality Score that AdWords Can’t.

    Why Is Quality Score Important?

    As previously stated, a good quality score can lower cost per click while increasing your ad rank. The reason is simple: relevance. For example, Google doesn’t want to serve up an ad for string cheese to someone searching for a 2017 Toyota Tacoma. They also don’t want keywords that match an ad landing on a page that’s about something else entirely.

    As such, Google will reward you by multiplying your cost per click by your quality score in order to determine your ad rank. What that means is you can spend less per click than your competitor and outrank them.

    Yes, this is an oversimplification of why quality score is important but I’m ready to move on to the meat and potatoes of this post. Don’t worry though, I’d never leave you hanging. Here is a video by the chief economist over at Google, Hal Varian, titled Insight on the Adwords Auction.

    #1 Use Optmyzr’s Quality Score Tracker

    That’s not to say that you can’t use what Google gives you, but our team uses Optmyzr to track our quality scores. Why? Because when you have as many accounts as we do (I work for an digital ad agency) with dozens of campaigns, ad groups, ads and keywords in play at the same time, we need all the help we can get in order to quickly pinpoint the areas we need to focus on the most.

    We’ve worked the Quality Score Tracker into our daily process and our clients are way better off because of it. We’ve also learned that this is a great tool to show clients. Granted, there is some debate out there about whether quality score is a good metric to show a client or not but with the way we do things, it’s great. We like to teach our clients because we believe that a learned client is a lifelong client and, as long as they understand what kind of return on ad spend (ROAS) they are getting, one who understands the benefits of larger paid search budgets

    Below is a real screen-shot of a dealership client of ours:

    Right off the bat we can see where the issue is. Overall, the account quality score is good at a 7.7 but as we all know, there’s always room for improvement.� That red circle on the top left stands out, doesn’t it?

    Clicking into it we can see the offending ad group in addition to the offending keywords. We can even see the quality score over time. Below where it says Daily Trend (bottom of image) there is a line graph that tells you exactly when the quality score dipped. Armed with that knowledge, I’m able to go into AdWords and see that the ad was wrong. While the ad had been changed to include the year of the vehicle, the keywords for this particular ad group didn’t include that information. Since the keywords being bid on didn’t match the ad and, of course, the landing page when the ad was clicked on didn’t match the ad, the quality score went down.

    This took just a few minutes to find and then correct.

    #2 Use Long Tail Keywords – Expected CTR Quality & Ad Relevance

    Competitive keywords can be difficult to manage in both organic and paid search, especially in the more competitive industries, which is why you should always be picky about the keywords you use. With long-tail keywords you can be more specific and specificity equals a higher conversion rate, less cost per click and a higher expected click through rate.

    If you really want to take the whole superhuman CTR thing to the next level then think about using single keyword ad groups (SKAGs). True, these may take a bit more work to implement but your CTR will thank you. There are more than a few reasons why you’d want to take a closer look at SKAGs and I encourage you to if you aren’t familiar with them or haven’t tried them yet. One of the main reasons why SKAGs work so well is because they are so very relevant. Using SKAGs you can ensure that every keyword used (don’t forget about long-tail here) is in the ad copy of the ad.

    Yes, you can use dynamic keyword insertion for this, but for more flexibility, try SKAGs.

    Negative keywords are your friends. For some reason negative keywords are easy to overlook, but they should be paid close attention. The search term report will show you the holes that need to be plugged. Plug them, but keep checking back to make sure another leak hasn’t sprung.

    #3 Use EVERY Ad Extension Possible – Expected CTR Quality & Ad Relevance

    I see a lot of accounts once we take them over from another agency and it always confuses me as to why more ad extensions aren’t used. Not only do they give your ad more bling, they also take up more space (this is really good on mobile), increase relevancy and drive up the click through rate.

    I understand that not all ad extensions will be relevant in every case, but use all that make sense. Yes, some are more time consuming than others but the more you use the better your ads will perform.

    Take a look at the price extension. Can you use it? Then do it. It takes up a ton of space on mobile and can really drive your competitors down. Recently, Google announced that price extensions are now available on all devices. Again, they take up a lot of space and, on desktop, look really cool. Need more of that bling I mentioned earlier? Well, here you go.

    Also, make sure that you’re at least using location extensions (if you have a physical location), call extensions, structured snippets, site links, call outs and the message extension. Sound like a lot? This is just the tip of the extension iceberg, make sure to use as many as you can. When it comes to extensions, remember that more specific is better. What I mean by that is that you can add account level extensions but you’ll see better success if you narrow it down to the campaign level or, better yet, the ad group level. Just remember to keep your eye on the prize, a better quality score.

    #4 Ongoing Ad Optimization– Expected CTR Quality & Ad Relevance

    One ad per ad group isn’t enough, neither are two. Google recommends at least 3 per ad group. The best way to get the best performing ads is by doing A/B split testing, even if you are using SKAGs. Also, think about copywriting and how you can turn a boring ad into a more compelling ad that invites a click.

    The best way to ensure that your ads are highly targeted is to always write each one from scratch. Never stagnate, always try to beat your best performing ads by writing even more compelling copy for the next ad. If you have long-tail keywords going to a highly converting ad then you are well on your way to increasing your click through rate and your ad relevance.

    #5 Take a Long Hard Look at Your Landing Pages – Landing Page Experience

    You wouldn’t send an ad about toothpaste to a page selling candy would you? Rhetorical question, but sometimes it takes an absurd question to drive a point home. My point is that you should be as obsessed with making your landing page match the ad as you are about the ad matching the keyword. That’s a great start but you need to go further than that.

    First, make sure that the landing page looks just as good on mobile as it does on desktop. Pay close attention to the speed of the page because Google has gone on record as saying� that 53% of smartphone users will abandon a web page if the site takes more than 3 seconds to load. 3 Seconds! Couple that with a recent study that shows we have an average attention span of just 8 seconds� (1 second less than a goldfish) and you have a recipie for disaster if you aren’t careful.

    While I won’t be going into depth about landing pages in this post I think it’s important to ensure that your landing page has a call to action. What’s a call to action? Anything that gets people to act on whatever it is that you want them to do. It can be a lead form submission, a download, a phone call or even watching a video. Whatever it is it has to be very easy to do. Making people jump through hoops won’t lead to conversion. Having said that, if it’s not feasible to put the final call to action on the actual landing page, then you must make sure that your site is easy to navigate with a clear path to your desired conversion. Take a long hard look at your landing page data and pay particular attention to what is happen in analytics. Are they converting? Are they following the path you’ve laid out for them? If not, why not? Take a look at the data from both the desktop and mobile perspective, is anything off? If so, fix it.

    Don’t Stop There

    Keep optimizing. Don’t let your account, or your client’s account, slowly die. Stay active, make adjustments regularly and become obsessed with raising the bar. Never stop until the bar is as high as it can possibly go. � There has been a lot of talk over the years, even research done on the importance of account activity. So, stay active my friends.

    Five Ways Optmyzr Tracks Quality Score that AdWords Can’t

    Today Google announced� the addition of seven new Quality Score (QS) fields in AdWords, including historical QS. It goes without saying that we’re big fans of giving advertisers access to this data. After all, Optmyzr’s first major tool was the historical QS tracker we launched in the summer of 2013. Ever since then we’ve tracked billions of points of data to help advertisers make more sense of their Quality Scores.

    Is there a need to continue to use tools for QS tracking now that Google is providing the same functionality directly in AdWords?

    tweet.png

    Like Jacob from our friends at Hanapin says, it’s definitely nice that any advertiser can now get the data, without needing to resort to tools, or AdWords Scripts. But there are some significant benefits you get from using Optmyzr to track QS. Here are 5 things you can do with Quality Score in Optmyzr that you can’t in AdWords.

    #1: Optmyzr Helps� You Prioritize Quality Scores To Fix

    While AdWords now includes both the current and historical QS, it doesn’t have a column for letting you see the difference between these two numbers. That may seem trivial but when dealing with hundreds or thousands of keywords, it’s nice to have a simple way to find keywords with the biggest increase or decrease in QS.

    Optmyzr’s Quality Score Tracker includes a column called QS Change. It shows the numerical difference between the QS on the start and end date of the selected range. By clicking on this column, it’s very easy to find keywords with the biggest drop in Quality Score. It’s a great tool to identify the keywords most in need of some attention.

    Biggest QS Drops By Keywords.png
    The column “QS Change” makes it easy to see which items had the biggest change between 2 dates.

    #2: Optmyzr Shows� Aggregate QS� and Account QS

    It’s easy to focus your attention in the wrong place if you’re not taking volume into consideration. For example, look at the screenshot in the last paragraph� and notice that the keyword with the biggest decline in QS had 18 impressions. It might be possible to improve that keyword’s Quality Score, but how much will that really benefit the account?

    That’s why Optmyzr has always provided aggregate QS in the form of an impression-weighted account-level quality score, as well as campaign-QS and ad group-QS.

    This helps advertisers focus on making changes in the places that can have the biggest payoff. For example, here’s where the biggest QS improvements are in this account. Because it’s aggregated at the ad group level, there is more data, making the insights more meaningful.

    Ad Group Quality Score Changes.png
    See which ad groups had the biggest gains in Quality Score.

    Optmyzr even recommends which ad groups would most benefit from an optimization by doing a weighted sort on cost and low QS.

    Ad Groups To Optimize For Quality Score.png
    Optmyzr recommends ad groups to optimize for Quality Score based on the possible financial upside.

    #3: Optmyzr� Visualizations Make QS� Easier to Understand

    We’ve always believed that historical QS change is a useful metric to inform advertisers whether Google likes the optimizations they are doing or not. As a PPC optimization company, this is obviously an important criteria for us and our customers to think about.

    In AdWords, you can now see historical QS by day by applying a daily segment to the keyword data. But in the resulting table� it’s pretty difficult to see a pattern of change.

    [][2]
    Daily QS in AdWords can only be seen in a table.

    Optmyzr makes understanding and� analyzing Quality Score data easier in several ways.

    First, we provide a clean dashboard that shows the changes in QS between any 2 dates when the AdWords account was connected to Optmyzr. Here we have an example showing the account level Quality Score change between March 1, 2017 and May 13, 2017.

    QS Dashboard.png
    Quality Score dashboard gives quick insight into QS for an account or any of its campaigns or ad groups.

    Next, unlike in AdWords where QS is not a value available for charts, Optmyzr does have time charts showing QS changes. This makes it really easy to see if QS changed during a particular date range.

    QS Chart.png
    See Quality Score changes visualized on a chart and instantly pick out important dates when changes happened.

    #4: Optmyzr Connects The Dots on Quality Score Impact

    While the QS number 1 through 10 we see in accounts is based on position-normalized data, we can’t but wonder whether changes in bids, and the resulting changes in average position could have an impact on our QS. In Optmyzr, it’s very easy to investigate this question.

    Keyword Quality Score Correlated to CPC.png
    Optmyzr saves historical max CPC bids and lets you add this to a chart with Quality Score changes.

    #5: Optmyzr Includes Quality Score in Automated Reports

    We could debate whether including AdWords jargon like QS in client reports is a good thing or not. However, we know that many advertisers like to include it in reports, and especially in reports used by consultants and agencies to audit prospective new clients.

    Optmyzr lets you include Quality Score data in report templates. It can be shown either as a KPI value:

    Quality Score as a KPI in reports.png

    Or it can be shown as a time chart:

    Quality Score chart in scheduled reports.png

    The time chart has several interesting settings. The curve can be smoothed by showing weekly or monthly data (in addition to the ability to show daily data).

    Advertisers can even calculate the aggregate quality score for groups of campaigns by combining our campaign filters with campaign labels. For example, an advertiser can add a specific label to all their branded campaigns and then select this label in the report. There is no other way that we know of for� advertisers to get quality score aggregation for portions of their accounts.

    Quality Score Chart in Reports.png
    Change settings for how to include Quality Score in reports in Optmyzr’s report designer.

    Conclusion

    Optmyzr is excited that Quality Score is finally getting the treatment it deserves in the AdWords interface.� With a renewed focus on QS, we hope advertisers will use Optmyzr’s unique capabilities related to QS to� optimize their accounts.

    Four Ways to Manage Your AdWords Search Queries

    It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been running search campaigns. One thing that never goes away is search query management. Your search query or search terms report will continue to require attention because the way people search is constantly changing.� It is important to manage search queries because it directly impacts� return on investment (ROI). When managing search queries the two basic things to keep in mind are making sure that your ads are showing up for the right search queries and conveying the right message.

    Analyze search terms to find the good, bad and ugly

    The Search Terms Report from AdWords is useful to understand what your customers are looking for, but it can take time to go through all the information and leverage the huge� amount of data available.� You need to filter the information and identify what is relevant to your ads and campaigns to separate search terms with high potential (to add them to your keyword list) from the ones that aren’t relevant to your business (to add them as negative keywords). Adding good� search terms as keywords is the best way to ensure you will be bidding on the right keywords and won’t be� spending money showing your ad to people who aren’t interested in it.

    We have a couple of tools that can help you make the task much easier.

    #1 Add relevant search terms as keywords – Keyword Lasso

    One question that comes up often is – Why should I add search terms as keywords if my� ad is already showing for them? The answer – To manage bids and to control the messaging. If you don’t want to spend time going through lots of queries, you can use the Keyword Lasso to focus specifically on converting or high performing search terms.� This One-Click Optimization™ will help you save time by suggesting only search terms that have a good conversion rate or clickthrough rate (CTR), allowing you to add them as keywords in any match type with a single click. One of the most popular features of this optimization is the ability to create SKAGs (Single Keyword Ad Groups) that helps you upload multiple keywords in new ad groups in one go. You can read more about the SKAG feature here. Also, within the same tool, you can add queries that are irrelevant or not performing well as negatives at the ad group or campaign level.

    #2 Remove irrelevant traffic by adding negatives – Negative Keyword Finder

    With this optimization, you can quickly add negative keywords across your campaigns through shared negative lists. It finds words and phrases� that may be irrelevant at the account level. It analyzes� individual words that are part of search queries and� are not performing well. It also shows you phrases that the individual� words were part of in case you want to add them as negative phrase match. It also does a relevance analysis to determine if you intended to target those words before showing them in the list.

    This analysis tool helps you find queries that are getting the most clicks or have the highest cost but with a different approach: by showing you individual words.
    You can have several long tail search terms that individually have few� clicks, but sometimes there is a word that frequently appears among them, and if you were to aggregate data� for the queries that include this word you can identify trends. That is why the search terms word cloud� displays individual words with a large aggregate volume at account or campaign level.� After evaluating the single word, you can choose to add it to your keyword list or update your current ads with it. In other cases, if you find that it is irrelevant, you might want to add it as a negative keyword. It is also a great way to find new themes for ad groups. For example, if you’re a travel agency and you start seeing 2018 appearing often in the list, it means that people have started making travel plans for next year and it is a good idea to create ad groups to capture that traffic.

    #4 Show the right ads� – Traffic Sculptor

    Sometimes, AdWords� can show your ad even if it is not the match for the query because it prefers to broad or phrase match the query to a keyword with a higher rank. To prevent this from happening, this optimization finds search terms that are already present as keywords in your account but wrongly matched to other keywords. Then it recommends adding them as negatives (in other ad groups) to force Google to show the ad that was meant to show with the search term. This will guarantee that you are matching the most relevant� ad to the query each time. You can read more about how the Traffic Sculptor works here.

    Want to try these tools? Log in to your Optmyzr account or, start a 14-day free trial 🙂

     

    Optmyzr automates PPC account audits with PPC Investigator

    Finding answers to frequent questions like why an account saw an increase/decrease in clicks or conversions is tedious. A drop in conversions or clicks can be attributed to multiple elements like keywords, placements, or an entire network, which makes answering such questions difficult and time consuming.

    Optmyzr has automated this investigation process through its new PPC Investigator tool. If someday, your account experiences a sudden decrease in clicks, just ask PPC Investigator what brought on the change and you will get an answer within seconds.

    How does it work?

    As the performance of every metric depends on the performance of other underlying metrics, PPC Investigator uses the relationship between different metrics to show potential causality. Then it takes it to the next level and highlights exactly which element (keyword, ad group etc.) in the account caused performance to change. There are two levels at which the performance change can be investigated – Cause Chart and Root Cause Analysis

    Cause Chart

    The Cause Chart breaks down a metric’s performance into its underlying related metrics and highlights the metric that impacted performance in red. Analysis from the Cause Chart can help find those areas in an account that can benefit from a bid or ad optimization. For example, if conversions dropped and the underlying reason is identified to be an increase in impression share lost due to ad rank, a bid optimization will help. Subject to availability of budget, an account manager can choose to bid higher for better impression share, higher CTR and more conversions.

    Optmyzr_-_Cause Chart1

    But wait! That’s not all! PPC Investigator also helps in examining and identifying the positive and negative top movers in an� account. It shows the elements in an account (keywords, ad groups. campaigns) that were significant contributors to the change in the account over a period of time. This analysis is available under the Root Cause Analysis tab.

    Root Cause Analysis

    PPC Investigator’s Root Cause Analysis evaluates the exact Campaigns/Ad groups/Product partition/Keywords etc. responsible for change in an account. The tool finds the top contributors by taking into consideration individual keywords/ad groups/network/device and even their combinations like keyword+device or network+ad group. You can view the top three positive and negative movers for a particular account which are further broken down to check sub-contributors. Here is a quick overview of the account insights the Root Cause Analysis can give:

  • Identify the pain points which impacted account performance to streamline workflows. You’ll know exactly which keyword or ad group caused the change and needs to be investigated.
  • Check the impact of paused campaigns/ad groups/keywords and make a decision on whether you would like to enable them or keep them paused. These are keywords or campaigns that shows a 90-100% drop.
  • Find optimization opportunities by viewing the networks or devices that� might be pulling down the performance of an ad group or campaign.�
  • Optmyzr_Root Cause Analysis -2

    Read more about the PPC Investigator here. You can try it out in your Optmyzr account under the Data Insights tools.

     

    Use Quality Score Components to Optimize AdWords Campaigns

    AdWords Quality Score is still somewhat of a black box. Thanks in a large part to the numerous factors that Google takes into account while calculating QS during the real-time auction.� In 2007, Google started to show advertisers additional details about their Quality Scores. Originally, it only indicated if the landing page or CTR was an issue, but has since improved to show three components that factor into QS: ad text relevance, expected CTR and landing page relevance.� Thanks to the� latest reporting updates to their API, these three sub-components of Quality Score that have long been visible in the AdWords UI are now accessible through the API.

    We have already� included the three components of Quality Score – Predicted CTR, Ad Relevance and Landing Page Experience in the Quality Score Tracker.� This data makes it easier to identify specific� areas for improvement instead of shooting in the dark.

    Quality Score Components -1

    What are the three components of Quality Score?

    In AdWords, the three components are shown as ‘below average’, ‘average’ and ‘above average’. To give you an idea of the overall health of the account at the component level, we’ve come up with a way� to aggregate this data and� show you a numerical score that can range from 1 to 10, just like the QS number you’re already used to seeing from Google. This data is also available at the campaign, ad group and keyword level in the relevant tabs in the Quality Score Tracker. Showing the component scores at higher levels than just the keyword� helps you see bigger issues to focus on. For example, if you see that the Landing Page Experience score for the account is less than four then the website as a whole needs to be fixed.

    How can I use this data to optimize?

    You can also select a campaign with a low QS from the campaign selector on the left and then identify the ad groups that need to be optimized. The optimization can be done directly in your AdWords account.

    Check the score for the three Quality Score components in your Optmyzr account.
    Quality Score Tracker - three components

    We’ve already used this new data to optimize our own account’s QS so we hope you will find it useful too.

    Have you tried the new Quality Score Tracker for AdWords?

    The Quality Score Tracker is one of our most popular tools and we’ve just given it a makeover!� We’ve added several new capabilities that we’re sure you’ll love.

    See Historical QS At A Glance – We improved how we show historical QS by including the data for the first and last date of the selected date range on all views. We now also include the highest and lowest QS values from the selected period, giving you a better understanding of how your current QS compares with historical data.

    New Quality Score Tracker

    Find Areas of Opportunity – Our new Top Movers table shows the campaigns, ad groups, and keywords that saw the most significant change in Quality Score for the selected date range. This makes it easier to find items whose QS has slowly declined and need to be fixed. It also shows items whose QS has improved which may provide insights about the types of optimizations that are delivering results.

    Top QS Movers

    Find Ad Texts To Fix – We added the Keyword Ad Relevance subcomponent of QS to keywords and also aggregated it at the account, campaign, and ad group levels. This makes it easy to find instances where you can improve QS by improving the ad text using tools like our AB Ad Testing tool or the Ad Template Report Enhanced Script.

    Keyword-Ad Relevance

    See Only The Data You Need – We added a text search box so that you can quickly hone in on just the keywords, ad groups, and campaigns that contain specific text.

    A big change that we made to the Quality Score Tracker was that we now include impressions from all devices (mobile, desktops, tablets) on Google search to calculate the weighted impression share. Earlier, we were only using impression data from desktops on Google search. If you’re getting a lot of traffic from mobile, you’ll may notice a change in the account, campaign and ad group level Quality Scores.

    New MCC Dashboard Launched

    Both Google and Optmyzr launched updates to their MCC dashboards for AdWords today offering exciting new� functionality. Here’s what’s new.

    AdWords MCC Changes

    Here are the new capabilities launched in� the AdWords MCC update:

    1. Segment MCC data
    2. Filter MCC� data
    3. Graph MCC data
    4. See data� further back than 90 days

    Now you can segment the data the same way you already could in individual accounts, for example by day of week, network, device, click type, location on page (top or other), and conversion name. Here’s what that looks like when you segment the data by quarters:

    MCC segments

    You can also filter the data, for example to see just the accounts managed by a particular account manager or for a particular vertical. There are the same filters for metrics and conversion data we already know from individual AdWords accounts but here are the new filters associated with the MCC level:

    new mcc filters

    You can now view any two metrics on a chart. This is cool because it works together with the filters so it’s easy to get a chart for accounts that meet particular criteria, like who is managing them.

    My_Client_Center

    The most subtle but possibly most important change is that� you can now� look at data further back than� 90 days.

    Optmyzr MCC Changes

    At Optmyzr, here’s what we updated today along with a few other recent changes to our MCC that you may have missed:

    1. Filter data by network and device
    2. Include Google Analytics data
    3. Include account Quality Score data
    4. Redesigned� account picker
    5. Birds eye view improvements
    6. Enhanced account Cues
    7. Faster access to the Optimizations Inbox

    Before today’s updates we already offered a� date range picker that can use any date range, date range comparisons, and the ability to filter data for different segments and networks. Here’s what our filters look like:

    MCC Filters

    By linking your GA accounts to Optmyzr (a capability in� our Pro plan), you can add goals, goal conversion rate, and e-commerce directly to the MCC dashboard where you can even use date range comparisons to get a quick view into � how your results are changing.

    Google Analytics MCC

    We also offer a column that shows the account Quality Score, a metric we calculate from the keyword level QS numbers Google shows in their UI.� It’s useful to track this number in the MCC dashboard to find out if� all the optimization work you� do is paying off in terms of improving relevancy.

    Quality Score MCC

     

    Here’s the new account picker we launched. When you star accounts, you can see just those accounts in a separate view. Because every user gets to star their own accounts, this is particularly useful for teams where every person may be working on different accounts and wants to track those accounts most closely.

    Our birds eye view has a new icon to make it easier to find. This view can be very useful when you quickly need to see if a change in performance is due to a one-day anomaly or part of a longer trend.

    birds eye view

     

    Our account Cues feature is still in whitelist beta (contact us for access) and� it lets you compare� each account’s recent performance against historical expectations� for a set of typical KPIs that depend on� the business model of each account. The� cues look like red or green dots next to each account.

    account cues

    Here is the detail view you get when you click on the Cue:

    account cues 2

     

    Finally we’ve given our Optimizations Inbox a new home on the MCC dashboard. If you haven’t tried it yet, it’s a great place to find out which optimizations have the most changes available for all your accounts.

    Optimizations Inbox

     

    Pro Dashboard for Google AdWords and Analytics

    We recently launched a more powerful version of the Optmyzr MCC dashboard. What makes this dashboard so powerful is that it lets you:

    **View and compare goal data from Google Analytics along with data from AdWords
    ** You can link your Google Analytics account to Optmyzr and view goal and e-commerce data alongside AdWords data. In the favorite accounts tab, you can compare this data to a different date range and see how performance has changed.

    **Add notes and labels to accounts
    ** With the Pro dashboard you can add labels and notes at the account level and these will be visible to your team members. The search box at the top will help you filter accounts by label.

    Optmyzr-Pro Dashboard Optmyzr-Pro Dashboard

    Add more data fields like monthly budget, percentage of budget spent
    When managing multiple AdWords accounts it becomes difficult to see if all accounts are on track to spend the amount allocated for that period. With this feature you can specify a monthly budget for each account and then use the % Monthly Budget spent field to identify accounts that may not meet or may exceed the allocated budget. Even as a company if you’re managing multiple AdWords accounts, this feature will definitely come in handy.

    Optmyzr-Pro Dashboard-Segment

    **Segment data by network and device at the account level
    ** This is one of the most powerful features of the Pro dashboard. You can use the filters on the left side of the dashboard to see how much each account is spending on a particular network and device. You can see how performance for all your accounts has changed on mobile phones.

    � *This version of the dashboard is available to users on the Pro and Enterprise subscription plans

    Introducing Account Health Cues And Ask Optmyzr

    Figuring out whether an AdWords account is healthy or not can be a very time-consuming task, especially when managing multiple accounts. In the past we added red and� green arrows to show the directionality of key metrics to our MCC dashboard.

    [See Change In Metrics In AdWords][1]
    Optmyzr’s MCC dashboard shows changes in account performance using red and green arrows.

    However we found that this still didn’t help us quickly identify accounts that were in trouble� because accounts with lots of green arrows could still be underperforming. So one of our engineers, Manu, got to work� on figuring out how to roll up all the data into a single indicator of account health. Today we’re starting a whitelist� preview of what we came� up with: Account Cues.

    Each account gets a color coded dot that indicates how the account is performing for its key metrics when comparing a recent period to the last 6 months of data:

    [Account Cues][2]
    Account Cues use a single color-coded dot to indicate whether an account is meeting or missing its main goals.

    By clicking on the dot, you can see more data about the metrics that Cues is evaluating:

    [Account Cues Show Key Metrics][3]
    Account Cues analyzes the most important metrics for each account’s main goal.

     

    There are five types of cues available for every account and they are based on the main goal which can be sales (conversions), leads (converted clicks), traffic (clicks), branding (impressions), or meeting a target for one metric of your choice.

    For a goal like leads, we automatically analyze three� related metrics: converted clicks, converted click rate, and cost per converted click. � If any of these deviate more than 10% from the expected values based on six months of historical data, the account will be flagged with a red dot� to draw attention to it.

    Once you see that an account is not performing well, the next step is to investigate why. This can also be quite time-consuming so we tried to simplify this� too� with a new Data Insight� called “Ask Optmyzr”. When you start with this tool you can ask a question about why key metric is either up or down for a certain date range:

    Ask Optmyzr

    Then we pull several reports in the background and present the results in an easy-to-read manner like with a cause tree:

    [Ask Optmyzr Cause Tree][5]
    Quickly identify the main reasons why certain AdWords metrics are changing.

    The concept of this tool is that every metric depends on other underlying metrics and rather than randomly hunting in your account for things that are different we show potential causality. For example, if clicks are down like in the example above, we highlight that fact in red and we show the underlying related metrics: impressions and CTR. In this case CTR is not an issue (it’s green), so we look further down the tree to see that impressions are down because IS lost due to budget has increased dramatically. From this visualization we can quickly determine that raising the budget and taking a look at the conversion rate of the landing pages should help restore conversions to this account.

    We provide additional aggregated reporting for campaigns, ad groups, keywords, and queries to help you find the specific elements with the biggest change in the account. Finally, we combine all this data with segments like devices and networks to help you discover if any of these are contributing to the problem.

    We’re excited to launch Account Health Cues and Ask Optmyzr in whitelist� beta today and we can’t wait to hear your feedback about� how we can improve this to make your lives easier when managing PPC accounts. If you want to try it out, just drop us a line through the support links.

    See All Account Quality Scores In One Place

    One of the first tools built by Optmyzr was a Quality Score Tracker that lets you to see your account level quality score, and track historical quality scores of individual keywords.

    One of the more recent tools that we built, and one that I was specifically responsible for, is the multi client center (MCC) dashboard, where advertisers can get a quick view of all of their accounts, including recent stats as well as trends.

    I’m excited to announce that we’ve just merged these two capabilities: now you can see account level quality score directly on the MCC dashboard. Not only can you see the current quality score for the account, but you can also see how it has changed from one period to the next.

    [MCC Account Quality Score][3]
    See the account-level Quality Score for all the AdWords accounts you manage on a single page

     

    [Change in Account Level Quality Scores][4]
    See the percent change of the account-level Quality Scores for all your accounts on one screen.

    I hope you find this new integration useful…

    Regular Pages

    Digital Marketing in an Unpredictable VUCA World: PPC Town Hall 27

    If you’ve been watching the news over the last couple of years, you could be forgiven for thinking we live in a weird timeline where dreary writers like Edgar Allan Poe and Ray Bradbury reigned supreme.

    Between climate change, terrorism, economic struggle, and the health crisis of 2020, this year has embodied the term VUCA — volatility, uncertainty, complexity, and ambiguity. Yet this is the world we live in, and if digital marketers want to continue to have a place in it, we have to learn how to adapt our tactics and messaging to this reality.

    So this week on Episode 27 of PPC Town Hall, I wanted to bring in the authors of the report “Digital Marketing in a VUCA World” to share some of their insights from the research they conducted and to discuss what the roadmap for the future could look like.

    Our panelists for the week:

    As always, you can view this week’s episode of PPC Town Hall embedded below, or click here to browse all our episodes. In the meantime, here are some of the insights from this week’s PPC Town Hall on how to do digital marketing in an unpredictable VUCA world.

    1. What happens when agencies lose large amounts of revenue overnight

    Anders: We asked 20 agencies that participated in the survey, “How bad were you hit?” About 15% said ‘no change’; a huge chunk — about 50% of respondents — said between 10-40% reduction in media spend; and a fairly large percentage saying 40-60% reduction.

    When we’re looking at agencies having 40% of their media spend disappear, and as we know, a lot of the economic models are tied in some way to spend. Very few are on a retainer or consultancy basis. So this means they lose a lot of money and activity, and the rest of the activity had to be changed. Everybody’s panicking, so what do you do?

    Lukas: It’s actually been the case in some instances that the agency-client relationship has ended because of volatility. Bearing in mind that the vast majority of agencies — particularly the bigger ones in the UK — have very diverse clients in their portfolios, so that’s why the impact was mostly in the 40-60% range.

    But I definitely know of instances where clients have stopped their relationship with an agency because they were the most hit — tourism, hotels, and some retail as well. But other parts of retail, especially direct-to-consumer, actually thrived during this time.

    2. If you put the wrong data in, the wrong prediction comes out

    Anders: When we talk about volatility and VUCA, yes there’s health crises and lockdowns; but there’s also terrorism and the end of cookies. The direct impact is more easily measurable on this year’s health crisis because it’s such an abrupt change.

    Over the past 2 years, we saw people adopt automated or machine-based bidding massively. We also observed that agencies used dedicated data analysts in fewer cases than they did before. This surprised us.

    Lukas: It feels like the outcome was two sides of the same coin. On the one hand, there is less involvement from data analysts because there’s more reliance on AI. On the other hand, it’s not about the position of the analyst but the insight into performance is placed on marketers’ shoulders.

    So where you’d previously have a data analyst to support you with looking at trends and performance, it’s almost a standard part of the marketer’s job instead of focusing on platform and creatives.

    3. Data is the new oil

    Anders: Can you extract more value from your data than if you give it to a platform? It’s a question of who controls it and whether you should give it away to a third party like Google or Amazon.

    We think it’s very important to start controlling and protecting your own data. It doesn’t mean you shouldn’t make it flow; flowing data across platforms is extremely important to get better insights. But you need to consider each time you do that: what are you using, what are you giving away, and is there anything you can keep instead of letting someone else monetize it?

    4. The connection between automation and who’s deploying it

    Lukas: For me, the whole idea of paid search until now is its transparency. You can track everything down to each penny you spend and be able to show results. This is now changing the fundamentals of what paid search is for me, because I can’t explain everything (with less data).

    5. How people can use automated bidding more effectively

    Lukas: I personally see a huge degree of complacency when it comes to automated bidding, especially, in a lot of agencies. You’ll find that 90% of the time, you can set the AI to do your bidding for you and it’ll deliver decent performance.

    But it’s that 10% of the time where something goes wrong, or when you have a promotion that suddenly skews the data — and suddenly, you have an impulse that the tool cannot account for and everything falls apart.

    I even feel with some of the ways platforms sell automated bidding, like recommending not to touch things for 2 weeks to let the machines learn, you should never be in a position where you can’t change settings.

    6. Preparing for the end of cookies

    Anders: Will remarketing be in trouble as we see fewer and fewer cookies? Yes. Hopefully, the bad practices will die off and there’ll be some intelligent use of user data.

    So start building direct relationships with your users, like email or another channel where you own that user data. If you only have access to your customers and clients via platforms or audiences, you’re probably going to lose a lot of that access. So start building that proprietary database today.

    Conclusion

    As I mentioned this week on PPC Town Hall, the role of the PPC manager is changing from being in the middle of account performance to managing the periphery (read my full thoughts on the topic in my post for Search Engine Journal).

    But as we look to evolve our roles, we also have to remain aware of what’s happening in the wider world. From the geopolitical to the ecological, events transpire daily that impact the health of the digital marketing space… paid search included.

    That’s why spaces of learning (like PPC Town Hall) will only become more important in the coming months and years. So sign up for our mailing list (and tell your PPC peers) to get notified of all our events in advance and early access to some of our upcoming resources!

    Is there something on your mind? Do you have a topic you’d like us to cover on PPC Town Hall? Write to support@optmyzr.com and tell us about it, and we’ll try our best to address your concerns.

    Take Control of Geo Bid Adjustments and Placements with Optmyzr

    Imagine if your bank let you transfer money to people but made it difficult to decide who receives your transfers. Pretty silly, right?

    Despite the objections of every advertiser ever, it’s still not easy to tune many aspects of your campaigns in Google Ads. So it was pretty much second nature that we stepped up to make the experience better for our customers.

    Bid adjustments — using audience analytics and insights to regulate ad performance — are invaluable. But you can’t overlook the time-consuming chore that is bid management through Google’s engine. The challenge is even greater when it comes to setting placements, especially the ever-popular ‘exclude all mobile apps’ preference.

    Those are the two key areas of our recent Rule Engine updates designed to help account managers and PPC strategists speed things up. Let’s take a look at what’s new, where to find the updates, and how you can use them.

    New in Geo Bid Adjustment and Placements

    Simply put, these updates take the form of instant strategies in the Rule Engine, Optmyzr’s logic-driven rule builder that uses ‘if-then’ statements to get your account to take a specific action when certain conditions are met.

    These new strategies are:

    While our instant strategies come with recommended settings, they can be further customized and automated using your own preferences. If you’re familiar with how the Rule Engine works, you can create your own geo bid adjustment and placement strategies from scratch — all the components are there.

    Other Geo Bid Adjustment and Placement Features

    The Geo Bid Adjustments tool analyzes campaign performance in different locations and makes recommendations for bid adjustments. You can implement adjustments at the country, region, city, and zip/pin code level. This tool also lets you discover new cities based on traffic and target them according to ROAS or CPA.

    With Placements Exclusion, you can customize your strategy to prevent showcasing your ads at random in the Google Display Network. No more manually excluding apps one by one. Bypass the limits of Google Ads and remove your ads from showing via the entire mobile apps category.

    Optmyzr Tip: Stop wasting money on bids and sites that don’t yield profit or returns. These tools give you more granular control over campaign behavior based on geolocations and ad placement. You can use a mix of custom and instant strategies in the Rule Engine to improve your ad performance, or use these tools for research before you even build and run a campaign.

    Use Cases for Geo Bid Adjustments 

    1. Account for holidays or other closures.

    Depending on your industry and location, some events lead to virtually zero-sale days with customers focused on things other than shopping. With Geo Bid Adjustments, you can now mark those locations and lower your bid to account for those lulls in activity. Customize the bids to -90% to keep the campaign running but with reduced ad spend.

    2. Track cities with wasted ad spend.

    Throughout your campaign, you might find some locations don’t provide enough conversions for the number of clicks they show for. These might be areas where the cost per conversion is higher than the campaign average, resulting in potentially wasted spend. Now you can just use the ‘Find Expensive Cities’ instant strategy in Rule Engine, and customize your initial campaign actions to exclude these cities or create bid adjustments for those locations. Or, you can use the strategy as an alert system to be notified of locations that put out a higher CPA.

    3. Discover potential target locations.

    Due to erratic lockdowns and reopenings across the globe, businesses might start receiving traffic from newer locations where they didn’t drive sales in the past. You need a system to account for any possible new traffic. With the ‘Find New Cities’ strategy, you can find locations that showed traffic in the last 14 days but not before. Run this strategy twice a month to track any new traffic and find new areas of interest.

    Use Cases for Display Placements

    1. Target placements with a specific bid.

    While running a Display campaign without any targeted placements, you’ll see that the engine will automatically place you where it thinks your ad may perform best based on past data. With the Display Placements Exclusion tool, you can identify sites (or placements) where you’re doing well and customize your strategies to target these in future campaigns.

    2. Bid lower for placements with bad ROAS or CPA.

    Most ad placements on mobile devices happen below the fold, and the chances that people scroll down to even see to your ads are extremely thin. Your placements might not have enough viewability and will therefore have poor ROAS or CPA. With this same tool, you can see suggestions for such weak placements and lower your bid on them to prevent spending on low-converting traffic.

    3. Exclude placements on all apps or a specific operating system.

    While some apps are great to advertise on, others tend to have an audience who won’t benefit from your ad at all. With the Placements Exclusion instant strategy, you can stop your ads from showing on all mobile apps and even certain operating systems.

    Conclusion

    Between our new Rule Engine strategies and existing tools, Optmyzr allows you to truly control and optimize your campaigns beyond what Google’s automated rules will enable. This makes search marketers the final authority, and allows you to layer multiple powerful automations to support your campaigns efficiently.

    Analyze data based on preferred date ranges and other metrics to arrive at what’s best for your business, and focus your time on building excellent strategies rather than performing repetitive tasks.

    Save time, save ad spend, and take control back from Google.

    Try out these and all our other tools for 14 days at absolutely no risk with our free trial. No credit card required!

    How to Start Selling the Easy Way On Google Shopping

    Earlier this year, Google made an announcement that changed the way advertisers perceived Shopping campaigns. By making Google Shopping listings free, the world’s largest advertising network forced everyone selling tangible products to rethink their PPC strategies.

    Suddenly, this component of the Google advertising network became much more attractive.

    At first, brands and PPC marketers were captivated by the prospect of free ad space. Once the initial hype faded, it became clear that only a portion of Google Shopping listings would be made free and that certain conditions had to be met.

    To take advantage of these free listings, advertisers need to have active Google Merchant Center accounts and enable their products to show on all surfaces including Google Images, the Google Shopping tab, Google Lens, and Google Search.

    As of late May, our conversations with experts like Kirk Williams of Zato Marketing revealed that an average of 5-6% of Google Shopping listings were made complementary.

    But that’s not the only reason it makes sense to give your products Google Shopping visibility.

    If like many other brands, your business or client are just starting to get involved in building Google Shopping campaigns, this article will help you figure out how to sell on Google Shopping.

    In this article, we’ll explore:

    How to take advantage of Google Shopping listings

    Google Shopping allows advertisers to promote physical, shippable products with a greater amount of visual appeal. Consumers searching for ‘blue shoes’ or ‘leather couch’ can view and explore a range of product listings that match closely with what they’re looking for.

    Google Shopping campaigns come in two varieties: Standard and Smart.

    Image sourced from versafeed.com

    Standard campaigns are built manually to deliver on highly strategic goals. These require some understanding of product groups, campaign structures, and other campaign components in order to achieve a specific goal, such as a target ROAS.

    Smart campaigns on Google Shopping reduce the entry barrier by using machine learning and automation to speed up the process. This makes them ideal for small businesses with limited budgets, or advertisers who don’t have the time to build out Standard campaigns.

    While Standard campaigns afford greater control over location targeting, negative keywords, custom scheduling, and network placement; Smart campaigns require historical data but will determine placement and other parameters for you based on past performance of other campaigns.

    Google Shopping: A proven channel for product visibility

    Google Shopping campaigns have always been considered a core part of the PPC marketer’s toolbox. They carry a visual component, which has proven to be more attractive than plain text when products are involved.

    Here are four more reasons why Google Shopping is a proven way to give your products the visibility they need, especially with the current economic landscape in mind.

    How to sell on Google Shopping the easy way

    Google Shopping campaigns can be highly valuable if your business calls for them. But it can be confusing and tricky to build them out if you don’t know exactly what you’re doing. Moreover, creating splits (e.g. by brand or category) takes a significant amount of time when done manually — and leaves you prone to human error.

    Optmyzr’s tools for Google Shopping cover the full life cycle, allowing you to create campaigns and set structures from scratch. Use us to do the heavy lifting and help you create the campaign structures you want, quickly and without error.

    With Optmytzr guiding you step by step, you can create both Standard and Smart Google Shopping campaigns and ad groups in just a few clicks.

    Campaign Builder 2.0

    Campaign Builder 2.0 is Optmyzr’s tool to build Standard and Smart Google Shopping campaigns from scratch. Anyone can link a spreadsheet or Google Merchant Center feed to get started in minutes.

    Product Group Refresher 2.0

    Product Group Refresher 2.0 optimizes existing Google Shopping campaigns by adding new products and product groups based on existing campaign structures. It looks at your current campaign structures and syncs with the feed to accurately reflect your inventory.

    Machine learning provides suggestions, and you can even automate the entire process. For example, when new products are added to the inventory feed, Optmyzr can automatically create new product groups for them.

    Manage Shopping Bids

    This optimization identifies high-performing product groups, allowing you to raise bids for product groups that are driving results. It also shows which product groups are underperforming or failing, letting you lower bids for them.

    By nature, this tool only supports Standard Google Shopping campaigns.

    Shopping Analysis

    One of our most popular Insight tools, Shopping Analysis helps Optmyzr users understand how their products are performing irrespective of structure. Use it to aggregate data and determine performance based on a number of different attributes.

    Aggregate data by price to see the performance and ROAS that products at different price points drive. Or if you’re selling shoes, easily see which sizes are more popular and sell more, or which ones aren’t in demand so you can fine-tune procurement.

    Shopping Analysis works with both Standard and Smart Google Shopping campaigns. With the former, you can use this aggregate data to change bids using the Attribute Bidder. For Smart Shopping, you can see which products are selling better — an insight that’s not easy to obtain in Google Ads.

    Conclusion

    While it’s admirable that Google is thinking of advertisers and supporting them with some complementary Shopping listings, there’s greater value to be experienced than just a couple of freebies.

    Unlike services, products have shape and form — and people love to see what they’re buying before they make a purchase. Google Shopping campaigns enable you to do this while expanding your reach, allowing small businesses to flourish and hobbyists to turn passion into profession.

    To learn more about how we can help you build and optimize Google Shopping campaigns with minimal time sink, write to us at support@optymzr.com or sign up to try Optmyzr free of cost.

    How to Scale Your PPC Budget While Maintaining ROAS

    Anyone who’s ever done strength training knows the challenge of overcoming a plateau. Once your body gets used to a certain regimen, it’s important to scale up your activity level — but without hurting yourself by doing too much too soon.

    The same logic applies to scaling your PPC budget.

    When your account is already performing well and receives a significant financial boost (like the one many brands will experience as we come out of the COVID-19 pandemic), it can be difficult to spend more while maintaining the same level of ROAS or CPA.

    While it’s fairly simple, it certainly isn’t easy.

    With that being said, here are some tips to help you to take greater control of your PPC budget without compromising on ROAS and CPA goals.

    Manage your budgets better

    If it sounds straightforward, that’s because it is. Effective budget scaling begins with making your marketing dollars work more efficiently, and a better understanding of where your account is experiencing the greatest returns and wastage.

    Fortunately, Optmyzr gives you the tools to get where you need to go.

    Optmyzr’s Spend Projection tool uses historical data to predict future spend.

    If your current campaign setup and traffic don’t exhaust your budget, there are additional steps you can take.

    Grow your account

    Given the way your current campaigns are set up, you may not have significant opportunity to grow your account traffic. In this case, you’ll need to grow your account.

    You can achieve this with a two-pronged approach.

    1. Hone more keyword opportunities

    Reviewing search terms with good performance can open up a world of possibilities that you may have neglected or been unaware of. Optmyzr lets you do this with a number of one-click optimizations.

    Use the Keyword Lasso tool to discover new opportunities to fully utilize your budget.

    2. Promote existing keywords, ad groups and campaigns

    Sometimes, it’s not a question of looking for new opportunities, but optimizing the ones you’re already capitalizing on to yield better results. We can help you take performing campaigns up a notch without needing to do the heavy lifting yourself.

    The Optimize Target CPA & ROAS tool helps increase conversions with automated bidding.

    The importance of risk mitigation

    At Optmyzr, we believe risk mitigation is a vital component of any evolving PPC strategy. So while you explore these options to expand your account and promote existing inventory, be sure to have a safety net in place.

    Maintain and monitor ROAS performance

    Once you have the different pieces in place, it’s important to keep a regular eye on things. As humans, we can provide context that machines don’t have and increase the chances of a favorable outcome.

    Conclusion

    PPC strategy is never as easy as we’d like it to be, and challenges like the ongoing pandemic add variables that can affect performance overnight.

    At a time when current data is volatile and historical data is unreliable, this ‘human context’ is more critical than ever to getting the most out of machine learning.

    By regularly checking in on your automations, you’ll be able to exert greater influence over how and where your marketing dollars are channeled, giving you a better chance of seeing the results your brand is looking for.

    How to See the New Queries That Now Trigger Your Ad

    In the past few weeks, search behavior – much like the rest of the world – has turned upside down in an unexpected and unprecedented manner. Whereas airlines might have normally seen a lot of searches related to flights for summer vacations, now they’re seeing entirely new search terms related to cancelations and COVID-19.

    With the influx of never-before seen queries, we added a new Rule Engine strategy (recipe) to help you stay on top of things. It finds queries (search terms) that had no impressions 2 weeks ago, but which have had impressions in the past week. These are considered ‘new queries’ for your account. By reviewing them periodically, you can see if shifts in user behavior are impacting your account negatively with an influx of searches you’d rather not pay for.

    This new strategy is also rather important given that exact match keywords can now be expanded by Google to include searches with a similar meaning. We don’t know exactly how Google defines ‘same meaning’ so it’s more important than ever to monitor search terms for your account.

    It’s easy for our customers with access to Rule Engine to try this new strategy.

    Step 1: Go to Rule Engine and add a new Instant Recipe

    Step 2: Preview results for the ‘New Search Queries’ recipe

    Step 3: Look at the new search queries for your account.

    Step 4: Customize the results by setting a different impression threshold.

    Managing AdWords AND Bing Ads? New Functionality Streamlines Both

    Anyone who has worked with Optmyzr knows our innovative platform has greatly streamlined and automated Pay-Per-Click campaign management for Google AdWords. Many marketers who work with our innovative PPC Management Software have seen significant improvements in campaign performance and agency profitability.

    We now offer much of that same automation to support Bing Ads management for agency and in-house marketers alike. PPC pros can tap the power of machine learning and artificial intelligence to help make Bing Ads accounts more effective and profitable – much the same way they use Optmyzr for AdWords.

    Specific features rolled out for Bing Ad management include an intuitive UI that brings together key PPC management tools in one package:

  • Budget and KPI monitoring: Marketers have access to powerful visualizations and alerts to track and manage against key metrics, such as conversions, return on ad spend (ROAS) and cost per conversion.
  • Ability to find new keywords and create single keyword ad groups (SKAGS): Optmyzr’s intuitive Keyword Lasso tool allows One-Click Optimization™, which automates analysis of search terms and identifies higher performing search queries. Previously only available to support AdWords accounts, the Keyword Lasso now allows the same ability to identify optimal keywords and create new ad groups that support SKAG ad group structures.
  • New ad creation in A/B testing: Optmyzr now extends ad creation and A/B testing for Bing Ads management. Marketers benefit from automated suggestions for ad content based on what has worked in campaigns.
  • Hour-of-week performance optimization: A new Hour of Week Bidder for Bing gives PPC pros recommended hourly bid adjustments, based on conversion and cost goals as well as other variables. Ad schedules can be changed in bulk, giving marketers greater ability to turn off ads when they are not needed.
  • Search term N-grams for Bing: This tool allows marketers to gain quick insight into long-tail search behaviors, helping to minimize wasted spend and improve results by unearthing words (N-grams) that lead to wasted spend.
  • Landing page analysis: PPC pros can now benefit from aggregated performance data for landing pages across Bing campaigns. This helps understand which pages perform well and gives insight into improvements that can be made to landing pages that have low conversion rates.
  • Geo HeatMap analysis: Optmyzr now brings powerful visualizations of Bing Ads geo data via an interactive heatmap. Marketers can tap this information to analyze traffic and conversions based on location, allowing more strategic budget allocation right down to the city level.
  • The above mentioned features are available to try out in Optmyzr. Use this link to access tools for Bing Ads accounts.

    Our developers have enhanced marketers’ abilities to optimize Google AdWords campaigns over the last several years. Of course, Google still dominates the PPC landscape, but Bing has gained market share for six consecutive years. As a result, many marketers now manage similar campaigns across both platforms. Our objective is to help marketers improve efficiency and profitability of their overall PPC initiatives.�

    Stay tuned for additional Bing-specific functionality as we move through 2018. We are working on additional ways marketers can extend instant optimizations and gain quick insights into their PPC programs.�

    5 Simple Ways To Increase Your Quality Score

    Quality score is like an onion, or a parfait if you’re Donkey from Shrek, because well, everybody likes a parfait.� Whether you prefer one analogy or the other, there’s always more to your quality score than meets the eye. On the surface, we all know what quality score is and why it’s important. So, why don’t we pay more attention to it? Most likely because it’s easy to see a 1-10 score and take it at face value. That’s merely the first layer, however, it’s beneficial to dig deeper and do more. Sure, we may tweak our campaigns a bit to increase quality score but how many of us are familiar with what it takes to truly improve the quality score? Moreover, why is quality score so important?

    Like much of Google (search algorithm anybody?) the available information is somewhat vague about how a quality score number is achieved.

    This is how Google defines it:

    Quality Score is an estimate of the quality of your ads, keywords, and landing pages. Higher quality ads can lead to lower prices and better ad positions.

    Google goes on to tell us that the 3 components of the quality score are:

    Yes, that’s a bit oversimplified, but it does give us a place to start. First off, we know that quality score is important because a better score can lead to higher ad ranks and lower per click costs. Who doesn’t want that?

    To confuse matters more, Google then goes on to tell us that the 1-10 quality score given, which is just an aggregated estimate, isn’t even used at the time of the auction to determine ad rank. Why? Because it is� just an estimate after all.

    What do they use then? I’ll let Google tell you:

    Real-time, auction-specific quality calculations of expected clickthrough rate, ad relevance, and landing page experience are used to calculate Ad Rank at auction time. These factors, which are based on things known only at the time of the auction, can heavily influence the quality of the user’s experience.

    So, while we may not know the exact score at the time of each auction, we do have a pretty good idea of the quality by looking at the quality score we do have. Yes, I agree, it would be better to have a deeper level of insight into why your score may not be where you want it but Google has, in recent weeks, added more to the standard 1-10 quality score.

    If you haven’t noticed it yet you can now also see

    You also have access to a history for each keyword that will let you know if you’ve improved or not. While it is nice that these are now available, seeing only average, above average and below average can you leave you wanting but at least it’s a step in the right direction.

    This is why we’ve been using Optmyzr’s Quality Score Tracker. Not only does it show us the data that Adwords gives us for quality score, it goes above and beyond with great visuals while also aggregating account, campaign, and ad group quality score data. No need for me to go into the differences here, Frederick Vallaeys has already done that by giving us Five Ways That Optmyzr Tracks Quality Score that AdWords Can’t.

    Why Is Quality Score Important?

    As previously stated, a good quality score can lower cost per click while increasing your ad rank. The reason is simple: relevance. For example, Google doesn’t want to serve up an ad for string cheese to someone searching for a 2017 Toyota Tacoma. They also don’t want keywords that match an ad landing on a page that’s about something else entirely.

    As such, Google will reward you by multiplying your cost per click by your quality score in order to determine your ad rank. What that means is you can spend less per click than your competitor and outrank them.

    Yes, this is an oversimplification of why quality score is important but I’m ready to move on to the meat and potatoes of this post. Don’t worry though, I’d never leave you hanging. Here is a video by the chief economist over at Google, Hal Varian, titled Insight on the Adwords Auction.

    #1 Use Optmyzr’s Quality Score Tracker

    That’s not to say that you can’t use what Google gives you, but our team uses Optmyzr to track our quality scores. Why? Because when you have as many accounts as we do (I work for an digital ad agency) with dozens of campaigns, ad groups, ads and keywords in play at the same time, we need all the help we can get in order to quickly pinpoint the areas we need to focus on the most.

    We’ve worked the Quality Score Tracker into our daily process and our clients are way better off because of it. We’ve also learned that this is a great tool to show clients. Granted, there is some debate out there about whether quality score is a good metric to show a client or not but with the way we do things, it’s great. We like to teach our clients because we believe that a learned client is a lifelong client and, as long as they understand what kind of return on ad spend (ROAS) they are getting, one who understands the benefits of larger paid search budgets

    Below is a real screen-shot of a dealership client of ours:

    Right off the bat we can see where the issue is. Overall, the account quality score is good at a 7.7 but as we all know, there’s always room for improvement.� That red circle on the top left stands out, doesn’t it?

    Clicking into it we can see the offending ad group in addition to the offending keywords. We can even see the quality score over time. Below where it says Daily Trend (bottom of image) there is a line graph that tells you exactly when the quality score dipped. Armed with that knowledge, I’m able to go into AdWords and see that the ad was wrong. While the ad had been changed to include the year of the vehicle, the keywords for this particular ad group didn’t include that information. Since the keywords being bid on didn’t match the ad and, of course, the landing page when the ad was clicked on didn’t match the ad, the quality score went down.

    This took just a few minutes to find and then correct.

    #2 Use Long Tail Keywords – Expected CTR Quality & Ad Relevance

    Competitive keywords can be difficult to manage in both organic and paid search, especially in the more competitive industries, which is why you should always be picky about the keywords you use. With long-tail keywords you can be more specific and specificity equals a higher conversion rate, less cost per click and a higher expected click through rate.

    If you really want to take the whole superhuman CTR thing to the next level then think about using single keyword ad groups (SKAGs). True, these may take a bit more work to implement but your CTR will thank you. There are more than a few reasons why you’d want to take a closer look at SKAGs and I encourage you to if you aren’t familiar with them or haven’t tried them yet. One of the main reasons why SKAGs work so well is because they are so very relevant. Using SKAGs you can ensure that every keyword used (don’t forget about long-tail here) is in the ad copy of the ad.

    Yes, you can use dynamic keyword insertion for this, but for more flexibility, try SKAGs.

    Negative keywords are your friends. For some reason negative keywords are easy to overlook, but they should be paid close attention. The search term report will show you the holes that need to be plugged. Plug them, but keep checking back to make sure another leak hasn’t sprung.

    #3 Use EVERY Ad Extension Possible – Expected CTR Quality & Ad Relevance

    I see a lot of accounts once we take them over from another agency and it always confuses me as to why more ad extensions aren’t used. Not only do they give your ad more bling, they also take up more space (this is really good on mobile), increase relevancy and drive up the click through rate.

    I understand that not all ad extensions will be relevant in every case, but use all that make sense. Yes, some are more time consuming than others but the more you use the better your ads will perform.

    Take a look at the price extension. Can you use it? Then do it. It takes up a ton of space on mobile and can really drive your competitors down. Recently, Google announced that price extensions are now available on all devices. Again, they take up a lot of space and, on desktop, look really cool. Need more of that bling I mentioned earlier? Well, here you go.

    Also, make sure that you’re at least using location extensions (if you have a physical location), call extensions, structured snippets, site links, call outs and the message extension. Sound like a lot? This is just the tip of the extension iceberg, make sure to use as many as you can. When it comes to extensions, remember that more specific is better. What I mean by that is that you can add account level extensions but you’ll see better success if you narrow it down to the campaign level or, better yet, the ad group level. Just remember to keep your eye on the prize, a better quality score.

    #4 Ongoing Ad Optimization– Expected CTR Quality & Ad Relevance

    One ad per ad group isn’t enough, neither are two. Google recommends at least 3 per ad group. The best way to get the best performing ads is by doing A/B split testing, even if you are using SKAGs. Also, think about copywriting and how you can turn a boring ad into a more compelling ad that invites a click.

    The best way to ensure that your ads are highly targeted is to always write each one from scratch. Never stagnate, always try to beat your best performing ads by writing even more compelling copy for the next ad. If you have long-tail keywords going to a highly converting ad then you are well on your way to increasing your click through rate and your ad relevance.

    #5 Take a Long Hard Look at Your Landing Pages – Landing Page Experience

    You wouldn’t send an ad about toothpaste to a page selling candy would you? Rhetorical question, but sometimes it takes an absurd question to drive a point home. My point is that you should be as obsessed with making your landing page match the ad as you are about the ad matching the keyword. That’s a great start but you need to go further than that.

    First, make sure that the landing page looks just as good on mobile as it does on desktop. Pay close attention to the speed of the page because Google has gone on record as saying� that 53% of smartphone users will abandon a web page if the site takes more than 3 seconds to load. 3 Seconds! Couple that with a recent study that shows we have an average attention span of just 8 seconds� (1 second less than a goldfish) and you have a recipie for disaster if you aren’t careful.

    While I won’t be going into depth about landing pages in this post I think it’s important to ensure that your landing page has a call to action. What’s a call to action? Anything that gets people to act on whatever it is that you want them to do. It can be a lead form submission, a download, a phone call or even watching a video. Whatever it is it has to be very easy to do. Making people jump through hoops won’t lead to conversion. Having said that, if it’s not feasible to put the final call to action on the actual landing page, then you must make sure that your site is easy to navigate with a clear path to your desired conversion. Take a long hard look at your landing page data and pay particular attention to what is happen in analytics. Are they converting? Are they following the path you’ve laid out for them? If not, why not? Take a look at the data from both the desktop and mobile perspective, is anything off? If so, fix it.

    Don’t Stop There

    Keep optimizing. Don’t let your account, or your client’s account, slowly die. Stay active, make adjustments regularly and become obsessed with raising the bar. Never stop until the bar is as high as it can possibly go. � There has been a lot of talk over the years, even research done on the importance of account activity. So, stay active my friends.

    Five Ways Optmyzr Tracks Quality Score that AdWords Can’t

    Today Google announced� the addition of seven new Quality Score (QS) fields in AdWords, including historical QS. It goes without saying that we’re big fans of giving advertisers access to this data. After all, Optmyzr’s first major tool was the historical QS tracker we launched in the summer of 2013. Ever since then we’ve tracked billions of points of data to help advertisers make more sense of their Quality Scores.

    Is there a need to continue to use tools for QS tracking now that Google is providing the same functionality directly in AdWords?

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    Like Jacob from our friends at Hanapin says, it’s definitely nice that any advertiser can now get the data, without needing to resort to tools, or AdWords Scripts. But there are some significant benefits you get from using Optmyzr to track QS. Here are 5 things you can do with Quality Score in Optmyzr that you can’t in AdWords.

    #1: Optmyzr Helps� You Prioritize Quality Scores To Fix

    While AdWords now includes both the current and historical QS, it doesn’t have a column for letting you see the difference between these two numbers. That may seem trivial but when dealing with hundreds or thousands of keywords, it’s nice to have a simple way to find keywords with the biggest increase or decrease in QS.

    Optmyzr’s Quality Score Tracker includes a column called QS Change. It shows the numerical difference between the QS on the start and end date of the selected range. By clicking on this column, it’s very easy to find keywords with the biggest drop in Quality Score. It’s a great tool to identify the keywords most in need of some attention.

    Biggest QS Drops By Keywords.png
    The column “QS Change” makes it easy to see which items had the biggest change between 2 dates.

    #2: Optmyzr Shows� Aggregate QS� and Account QS

    It’s easy to focus your attention in the wrong place if you’re not taking volume into consideration. For example, look at the screenshot in the last paragraph� and notice that the keyword with the biggest decline in QS had 18 impressions. It might be possible to improve that keyword’s Quality Score, but how much will that really benefit the account?

    That’s why Optmyzr has always provided aggregate QS in the form of an impression-weighted account-level quality score, as well as campaign-QS and ad group-QS.

    This helps advertisers focus on making changes in the places that can have the biggest payoff. For example, here’s where the biggest QS improvements are in this account. Because it’s aggregated at the ad group level, there is more data, making the insights more meaningful.

    Ad Group Quality Score Changes.png
    See which ad groups had the biggest gains in Quality Score.

    Optmyzr even recommends which ad groups would most benefit from an optimization by doing a weighted sort on cost and low QS.

    Ad Groups To Optimize For Quality Score.png
    Optmyzr recommends ad groups to optimize for Quality Score based on the possible financial upside.

    #3: Optmyzr� Visualizations Make QS� Easier to Understand

    We’ve always believed that historical QS change is a useful metric to inform advertisers whether Google likes the optimizations they are doing or not. As a PPC optimization company, this is obviously an important criteria for us and our customers to think about.

    In AdWords, you can now see historical QS by day by applying a daily segment to the keyword data. But in the resulting table� it’s pretty difficult to see a pattern of change.

    [][2]
    Daily QS in AdWords can only be seen in a table.

    Optmyzr makes understanding and� analyzing Quality Score data easier in several ways.

    First, we provide a clean dashboard that shows the changes in QS between any 2 dates when the AdWords account was connected to Optmyzr. Here we have an example showing the account level Quality Score change between March 1, 2017 and May 13, 2017.

    QS Dashboard.png
    Quality Score dashboard gives quick insight into QS for an account or any of its campaigns or ad groups.

    Next, unlike in AdWords where QS is not a value available for charts, Optmyzr does have time charts showing QS changes. This makes it really easy to see if QS changed during a particular date range.

    QS Chart.png
    See Quality Score changes visualized on a chart and instantly pick out important dates when changes happened.

    #4: Optmyzr Connects The Dots on Quality Score Impact

    While the QS number 1 through 10 we see in accounts is based on position-normalized data, we can’t but wonder whether changes in bids, and the resulting changes in average position could have an impact on our QS. In Optmyzr, it’s very easy to investigate this question.

    Keyword Quality Score Correlated to CPC.png
    Optmyzr saves historical max CPC bids and lets you add this to a chart with Quality Score changes.

    #5: Optmyzr Includes Quality Score in Automated Reports

    We could debate whether including AdWords jargon like QS in client reports is a good thing or not. However, we know that many advertisers like to include it in reports, and especially in reports used by consultants and agencies to audit prospective new clients.

    Optmyzr lets you include Quality Score data in report templates. It can be shown either as a KPI value:

    Quality Score as a KPI in reports.png

    Or it can be shown as a time chart:

    Quality Score chart in scheduled reports.png

    The time chart has several interesting settings. The curve can be smoothed by showing weekly or monthly data (in addition to the ability to show daily data).

    Advertisers can even calculate the aggregate quality score for groups of campaigns by combining our campaign filters with campaign labels. For example, an advertiser can add a specific label to all their branded campaigns and then select this label in the report. There is no other way that we know of for� advertisers to get quality score aggregation for portions of their accounts.

    Quality Score Chart in Reports.png
    Change settings for how to include Quality Score in reports in Optmyzr’s report designer.

    Conclusion

    Optmyzr is excited that Quality Score is finally getting the treatment it deserves in the AdWords interface.� With a renewed focus on QS, we hope advertisers will use Optmyzr’s unique capabilities related to QS to� optimize their accounts.

    Four Ways to Manage Your AdWords Search Queries

    It doesn’t matter how long you’ve been running search campaigns. One thing that never goes away is search query management. Your search query or search terms report will continue to require attention because the way people search is constantly changing.� It is important to manage search queries because it directly impacts� return on investment (ROI). When managing search queries the two basic things to keep in mind are making sure that your ads are showing up for the right search queries and conveying the right message.

    Analyze search terms to find the good, bad and ugly

    The Search Terms Report from AdWords is useful to understand what your customers are looking for, but it can take time to go through all the information and leverage the huge� amount of data available.� You need to filter the information and identify what is relevant to your ads and campaigns to separate search terms with high potential (to add them to your keyword list) from the ones that aren’t relevant to your business (to add them as negative keywords). Adding good� search terms as keywords is the best way to ensure you will be bidding on the right keywords and won’t be� spending money showing your ad to people who aren’t interested in it.

    We have a couple of tools that can help you make the task much easier.

    #1 Add relevant search terms as keywords – Keyword Lasso

    One question that comes up often is – Why should I add search terms as keywords if my� ad is already showing for them? The answer – To manage bids and to control the messaging. If you don’t want to spend time going through lots of queries, you can use the Keyword Lasso to focus specifically on converting or high performing search terms.� This One-Click Optimization™ will help you save time by suggesting only search terms that have a good conversion rate or clickthrough rate (CTR), allowing you to add them as keywords in any match type with a single click. One of the most popular features of this optimization is the ability to create SKAGs (Single Keyword Ad Groups) that helps you upload multiple keywords in new ad groups in one go. You can read more about the SKAG feature here. Also, within the same tool, you can add queries that are irrelevant or not performing well as negatives at the ad group or campaign level.

    #2 Remove irrelevant traffic by adding negatives – Negative Keyword Finder

    With this optimization, you can quickly add negative keywords across your campaigns through shared negative lists. It finds words and phrases� that may be irrelevant at the account level. It analyzes� individual words that are part of search queries and� are not performing well. It also shows you phrases that the individual� words were part of in case you want to add them as negative phrase match. It also does a relevance analysis to determine if you intended to target those words before showing them in the list.

    This analysis tool helps you find queries that are getting the most clicks or have the highest cost but with a different approach: by showing you individual words.
    You can have several long tail search terms that individually have few� clicks, but sometimes there is a word that frequently appears among them, and if you were to aggregate data� for the queries that include this word you can identify trends. That is why the search terms word cloud� displays individual words with a large aggregate volume at account or campaign level.� After evaluating the single word, you can choose to add it to your keyword list or update your current ads with it. In other cases, if you find that it is irrelevant, you might want to add it as a negative keyword. It is also a great way to find new themes for ad groups. For example, if you’re a travel agency and you start seeing 2018 appearing often in the list, it means that people have started making travel plans for next year and it is a good idea to create ad groups to capture that traffic.

    #4 Show the right ads� – Traffic Sculptor

    Sometimes, AdWords� can show your ad even if it is not the match for the query because it prefers to broad or phrase match the query to a keyword with a higher rank. To prevent this from happening, this optimization finds search terms that are already present as keywords in your account but wrongly matched to other keywords. Then it recommends adding them as negatives (in other ad groups) to force Google to show the ad that was meant to show with the search term. This will guarantee that you are matching the most relevant� ad to the query each time. You can read more about how the Traffic Sculptor works here.

    Want to try these tools? Log in to your Optmyzr account or, start a 14-day free trial 🙂

     

    Optmyzr automates PPC account audits with PPC Investigator

    Finding answers to frequent questions like why an account saw an increase/decrease in clicks or conversions is tedious. A drop in conversions or clicks can be attributed to multiple elements like keywords, placements, or an entire network, which makes answering such questions difficult and time consuming.

    Optmyzr has automated this investigation process through its new PPC Investigator tool. If someday, your account experiences a sudden decrease in clicks, just ask PPC Investigator what brought on the change and you will get an answer within seconds.

    How does it work?

    As the performance of every metric depends on the performance of other underlying metrics, PPC Investigator uses the relationship between different metrics to show potential causality. Then it takes it to the next level and highlights exactly which element (keyword, ad group etc.) in the account caused performance to change. There are two levels at which the performance change can be investigated – Cause Chart and Root Cause Analysis

    Cause Chart

    The Cause Chart breaks down a metric’s performance into its underlying related metrics and highlights the metric that impacted performance in red. Analysis from the Cause Chart can help find those areas in an account that can benefit from a bid or ad optimization. For example, if conversions dropped and the underlying reason is identified to be an increase in impression share lost due to ad rank, a bid optimization will help. Subject to availability of budget, an account manager can choose to bid higher for better impression share, higher CTR and more conversions.

    Optmyzr_-_Cause Chart1

    But wait! That’s not all! PPC Investigator also helps in examining and identifying the positive and negative top movers in an� account. It shows the elements in an account (keywords, ad groups. campaigns) that were significant contributors to the change in the account over a period of time. This analysis is available under the Root Cause Analysis tab.

    Root Cause Analysis

    PPC Investigator’s Root Cause Analysis evaluates the exact Campaigns/Ad groups/Product partition/Keywords etc. responsible for change in an account. The tool finds the top contributors by taking into consideration individual keywords/ad groups/network/device and even their combinations like keyword+device or network+ad group. You can view the top three positive and negative movers for a particular account which are further broken down to check sub-contributors. Here is a quick overview of the account insights the Root Cause Analysis can give:

  • Identify the pain points which impacted account performance to streamline workflows. You’ll know exactly which keyword or ad group caused the change and needs to be investigated.
  • Check the impact of paused campaigns/ad groups/keywords and make a decision on whether you would like to enable them or keep them paused. These are keywords or campaigns that shows a 90-100% drop.
  • Find optimization opportunities by viewing the networks or devices that� might be pulling down the performance of an ad group or campaign.�
  • Optmyzr_Root Cause Analysis -2

    Read more about the PPC Investigator here. You can try it out in your Optmyzr account under the Data Insights tools.

     

    Use Quality Score Components to Optimize AdWords Campaigns

    AdWords Quality Score is still somewhat of a black box. Thanks in a large part to the numerous factors that Google takes into account while calculating QS during the real-time auction.� In 2007, Google started to show advertisers additional details about their Quality Scores. Originally, it only indicated if the landing page or CTR was an issue, but has since improved to show three components that factor into QS: ad text relevance, expected CTR and landing page relevance.� Thanks to the� latest reporting updates to their API, these three sub-components of Quality Score that have long been visible in the AdWords UI are now accessible through the API.

    We have already� included the three components of Quality Score – Predicted CTR, Ad Relevance and Landing Page Experience in the Quality Score Tracker.� This data makes it easier to identify specific� areas for improvement instead of shooting in the dark.

    Quality Score Components -1

    What are the three components of Quality Score?

    In AdWords, the three components are shown as ‘below average’, ‘average’ and ‘above average’. To give you an idea of the overall health of the account at the component level, we’ve come up with a way� to aggregate this data and� show you a numerical score that can range from 1 to 10, just like the QS number you’re already used to seeing from Google. This data is also available at the campaign, ad group and keyword level in the relevant tabs in the Quality Score Tracker. Showing the component scores at higher levels than just the keyword� helps you see bigger issues to focus on. For example, if you see that the Landing Page Experience score for the account is less than four then the website as a whole needs to be fixed.

    How can I use this data to optimize?

    You can also select a campaign with a low QS from the campaign selector on the left and then identify the ad groups that need to be optimized. The optimization can be done directly in your AdWords account.

    Check the score for the three Quality Score components in your Optmyzr account.
    Quality Score Tracker - three components

    We’ve already used this new data to optimize our own account’s QS so we hope you will find it useful too.

    Have you tried the new Quality Score Tracker for AdWords?

    The Quality Score Tracker is one of our most popular tools and we’ve just given it a makeover!� We’ve added several new capabilities that we’re sure you’ll love.

    See Historical QS At A Glance – We improved how we show historical QS by including the data for the first and last date of the selected date range on all views. We now also include the highest and lowest QS values from the selected period, giving you a better understanding of how your current QS compares with historical data.

    New Quality Score Tracker

    Find Areas of Opportunity – Our new Top Movers table shows the campaigns, ad groups, and keywords that saw the most significant change in Quality Score for the selected date range. This makes it easier to find items whose QS has slowly declined and need to be fixed. It also shows items whose QS has improved which may provide insights about the types of optimizations that are delivering results.

    Top QS Movers

    Find Ad Texts To Fix – We added the Keyword Ad Relevance subcomponent of QS to keywords and also aggregated it at the account, campaign, and ad group levels. This makes it easy to find instances where you can improve QS by improving the ad text using tools like our AB Ad Testing tool or the Ad Template Report Enhanced Script.

    Keyword-Ad Relevance

    See Only The Data You Need – We added a text search box so that you can quickly hone in on just the keywords, ad groups, and campaigns that contain specific text.

    A big change that we made to the Quality Score Tracker was that we now include impressions from all devices (mobile, desktops, tablets) on Google search to calculate the weighted impression share. Earlier, we were only using impression data from desktops on Google search. If you’re getting a lot of traffic from mobile, you’ll may notice a change in the account, campaign and ad group level Quality Scores.

    New MCC Dashboard Launched

    Both Google and Optmyzr launched updates to their MCC dashboards for AdWords today offering exciting new� functionality. Here’s what’s new.

    AdWords MCC Changes

    Here are the new capabilities launched in� the AdWords MCC update:

    1. Segment MCC data
    2. Filter MCC� data
    3. Graph MCC data
    4. See data� further back than 90 days

    Now you can segment the data the same way you already could in individual accounts, for example by day of week, network, device, click type, location on page (top or other), and conversion name. Here’s what that looks like when you segment the data by quarters:

    MCC segments

    You can also filter the data, for example to see just the accounts managed by a particular account manager or for a particular vertical. There are the same filters for metrics and conversion data we already know from individual AdWords accounts but here are the new filters associated with the MCC level:

    new mcc filters

    You can now view any two metrics on a chart. This is cool because it works together with the filters so it’s easy to get a chart for accounts that meet particular criteria, like who is managing them.

    My_Client_Center

    The most subtle but possibly most important change is that� you can now� look at data further back than� 90 days.

    Optmyzr MCC Changes

    At Optmyzr, here’s what we updated today along with a few other recent changes to our MCC that you may have missed:

    1. Filter data by network and device
    2. Include Google Analytics data
    3. Include account Quality Score data
    4. Redesigned� account picker
    5. Birds eye view improvements
    6. Enhanced account Cues
    7. Faster access to the Optimizations Inbox

    Before today’s updates we already offered a� date range picker that can use any date range, date range comparisons, and the ability to filter data for different segments and networks. Here’s what our filters look like:

    MCC Filters

    By linking your GA accounts to Optmyzr (a capability in� our Pro plan), you can add goals, goal conversion rate, and e-commerce directly to the MCC dashboard where you can even use date range comparisons to get a quick view into � how your results are changing.

    Google Analytics MCC

    We also offer a column that shows the account Quality Score, a metric we calculate from the keyword level QS numbers Google shows in their UI.� It’s useful to track this number in the MCC dashboard to find out if� all the optimization work you� do is paying off in terms of improving relevancy.

    Quality Score MCC

     

    Here’s the new account picker we launched. When you star accounts, you can see just those accounts in a separate view. Because every user gets to star their own accounts, this is particularly useful for teams where every person may be working on different accounts and wants to track those accounts most closely.

    Our birds eye view has a new icon to make it easier to find. This view can be very useful when you quickly need to see if a change in performance is due to a one-day anomaly or part of a longer trend.

    birds eye view

     

    Our account Cues feature is still in whitelist beta (contact us for access) and� it lets you compare� each account’s recent performance against historical expectations� for a set of typical KPIs that depend on� the business model of each account. The� cues look like red or green dots next to each account.

    account cues

    Here is the detail view you get when you click on the Cue:

    account cues 2

     

    Finally we’ve given our Optimizations Inbox a new home on the MCC dashboard. If you haven’t tried it yet, it’s a great place to find out which optimizations have the most changes available for all your accounts.

    Optimizations Inbox

     

    Pro Dashboard for Google AdWords and Analytics

    We recently launched a more powerful version of the Optmyzr MCC dashboard. What makes this dashboard so powerful is that it lets you:

    **View and compare goal data from Google Analytics along with data from AdWords
    ** You can link your Google Analytics account to Optmyzr and view goal and e-commerce data alongside AdWords data. In the favorite accounts tab, you can compare this data to a different date range and see how performance has changed.

    **Add notes and labels to accounts
    ** With the Pro dashboard you can add labels and notes at the account level and these will be visible to your team members. The search box at the top will help you filter accounts by label.

    Optmyzr-Pro Dashboard Optmyzr-Pro Dashboard

    Add more data fields like monthly budget, percentage of budget spent
    When managing multiple AdWords accounts it becomes difficult to see if all accounts are on track to spend the amount allocated for that period. With this feature you can specify a monthly budget for each account and then use the % Monthly Budget spent field to identify accounts that may not meet or may exceed the allocated budget. Even as a company if you’re managing multiple AdWords accounts, this feature will definitely come in handy.

    Optmyzr-Pro Dashboard-Segment

    **Segment data by network and device at the account level
    ** This is one of the most powerful features of the Pro dashboard. You can use the filters on the left side of the dashboard to see how much each account is spending on a particular network and device. You can see how performance for all your accounts has changed on mobile phones.

    � *This version of the dashboard is available to users on the Pro and Enterprise subscription plans

    Introducing Account Health Cues And Ask Optmyzr

    Figuring out whether an AdWords account is healthy or not can be a very time-consuming task, especially when managing multiple accounts. In the past we added red and� green arrows to show the directionality of key metrics to our MCC dashboard.

    [See Change In Metrics In AdWords][1]
    Optmyzr’s MCC dashboard shows changes in account performance using red and green arrows.

    However we found that this still didn’t help us quickly identify accounts that were in trouble� because accounts with lots of green arrows could still be underperforming. So one of our engineers, Manu, got to work� on figuring out how to roll up all the data into a single indicator of account health. Today we’re starting a whitelist� preview of what we came� up with: Account Cues.

    Each account gets a color coded dot that indicates how the account is performing for its key metrics when comparing a recent period to the last 6 months of data:

    [Account Cues][2]
    Account Cues use a single color-coded dot to indicate whether an account is meeting or missing its main goals.

    By clicking on the dot, you can see more data about the metrics that Cues is evaluating:

    [Account Cues Show Key Metrics][3]
    Account Cues analyzes the most important metrics for each account’s main goal.

     

    There are five types of cues available for every account and they are based on the main goal which can be sales (conversions), leads (converted clicks), traffic (clicks), branding (impressions), or meeting a target for one metric of your choice.

    For a goal like leads, we automatically analyze three� related metrics: converted clicks, converted click rate, and cost per converted click. � If any of these deviate more than 10% from the expected values based on six months of historical data, the account will be flagged with a red dot� to draw attention to it.

    Once you see that an account is not performing well, the next step is to investigate why. This can also be quite time-consuming so we tried to simplify this� too� with a new Data Insight� called “Ask Optmyzr”. When you start with this tool you can ask a question about why key metric is either up or down for a certain date range:

    Ask Optmyzr

    Then we pull several reports in the background and present the results in an easy-to-read manner like with a cause tree:

    [Ask Optmyzr Cause Tree][5]
    Quickly identify the main reasons why certain AdWords metrics are changing.

    The concept of this tool is that every metric depends on other underlying metrics and rather than randomly hunting in your account for things that are different we show potential causality. For example, if clicks are down like in the example above, we highlight that fact in red and we show the underlying related metrics: impressions and CTR. In this case CTR is not an issue (it’s green), so we look further down the tree to see that impressions are down because IS lost due to budget has increased dramatically. From this visualization we can quickly determine that raising the budget and taking a look at the conversion rate of the landing pages should help restore conversions to this account.

    We provide additional aggregated reporting for campaigns, ad groups, keywords, and queries to help you find the specific elements with the biggest change in the account. Finally, we combine all this data with segments like devices and networks to help you discover if any of these are contributing to the problem.

    We’re excited to launch Account Health Cues and Ask Optmyzr in whitelist� beta today and we can’t wait to hear your feedback about� how we can improve this to make your lives easier when managing PPC accounts. If you want to try it out, just drop us a line through the support links.

    See All Account Quality Scores In One Place

    One of the first tools built by Optmyzr was a Quality Score Tracker that lets you to see your account level quality score, and track historical quality scores of individual keywords.

    One of the more recent tools that we built, and one that I was specifically responsible for, is the multi client center (MCC) dashboard, where advertisers can get a quick view of all of their accounts, including recent stats as well as trends.

    I’m excited to announce that we’ve just merged these two capabilities: now you can see account level quality score directly on the MCC dashboard. Not only can you see the current quality score for the account, but you can also see how it has changed from one period to the next.

    [MCC Account Quality Score][3]
    See the account-level Quality Score for all the AdWords accounts you manage on a single page

     

    [Change in Account Level Quality Scores][4]
    See the percent change of the account-level Quality Scores for all your accounts on one screen.

    I hope you find this new integration useful…