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PPC Town Hall 18: Grow your business with PPC scripts

PPC marketers are always optimizing — some monitoring here, an adjustment there, and then you start to see (better) results. When you have that much to do, it’s impossible to do it manually and scale your output.

So there’s no reason to fear automation — like scripts. They not only speed up the process, but also allow you to be much more efficient in running your business. That’s right — scripts can drive business impact.

Best of all, anyone can use scripts, even if you haven’t written even a single line of code in your life!

So this week on episode 18 of PPC Town Hall, we spoke to our panelists who live and breathe scripts:

As always, you can view this week’s episode as well as previous editions of PPC Town Hall right here.

Here are 5 insights to help you grow your business by automating your PPC accounts with scripts.

1. Update price extensions

Nils: Price extensions are very popular extensions that you can use in your Google Ads accounts to display actual prices. But prices tend to change quite often. If you have different products, and the product manager or account manager is changing the prices of the products because of inventory or competition, you need to update the price extensions with the actual prices.

Up until a year ago, it was impossible to update them through scripts. Fortunately, now we can access the price extensions via the scripts API to keep them in sync with your inventory.

To check the price extensions, you need to do the following: Google Ads scripts → References → AdsApp → Ad Extensions → Prices.

2. When to turn to scripts

Steve: ‘This is taking too much manual work’ is the point where we begin to think about building scripts to shorten the whole process. Most of the time, it’s brought up due to some amount of laziness on our part. For example, I’m currently working on Search Query reports and rely on scripts to deliver automated reports to me.

One of the best things about scripts is that you get to see this functionality and dozens of ways one can apply that across campaigns. The fun of scripts is finding something and imagining creative ways to apply them.

3. The business value of scripts

Nils: Scripts deliver great benefits all over the place. I’ve created a list of the Top 7 benefits of using scripts. Personally I try to automate as much as possible by using scripts. It has helped my remote PPC agency succeed and apply consistent processes to operations. With scripts, you can come up with new ideas to test your account, which wouldn’t have been possible manually. For example, we know that N-gram analysis is very tedious and time-taking. But with scripts, something that complex becomes quicker and can be done more frequently.    

The biggest benefit of scripts for my agency has been quality assurance. As the scripts are monitoring everything, any mistake done by my team comes under notice quickly. This way I can be alerted when anything goes haywire and sleep easy.  

Steve: We recently shifted to a new revenue model — cost per deliverable, where we charge our customers a fixed amount for our services. Scripts allow me to do that a lot more efficiently.

It’s not a discussion of hours anymore. Our clients are more focused on whether the product runs efficiently rather than how. This allows me to take my expertise and focus on deliverables rather than time.

4. Copy-pasting and modifying scripts

Steve: I think in blocks, which is basically the JavaScript way of thinking. Figuring out which functions do what, and letting them flow through until you get all the pieces for the script. In a lot of cases, you will get pre-built scripts to work on.

For example, Google’s Account Anomaly script is very easy to adjust to things that you are looking for in your anomalies. This can be a good base to get started with scripts.

5. Using scripts to monitor Google’s AI

Nils: We know that Google AI uses machine learning to predict performances on clicks. And machine learnings involves a ‘learning phase’. We are basically providing Google money and data to feed it to the machine learning algorithms. This is where I love to use scripts to track how AI is handling my accounts. If it goes haywire, and does a bad job for my clients my scripts would alert me immediately.

For example, for close variants, I have created a script to monitor the performance of the real keyword against the close variant. If there’s a significant difference in the performance, like in CPA or ROAS, I get alerted of that. You need to layer scripts and Google’s AI to make the most of it.

Conclusion

It’s important to look at Google Ads holistically. Everything — bids, budgets, ad text — influences this interconnected system. It’s not enough to set a script and forget it; you have to monitor it periodically as well.

Start out by using Google’s repository of pre-built scripts, or Nils’ collection of over 250 ready-to-use scripts.

As you gain experience, you can try modifying them to suit your specific needs. Experiment with existing rules to see how they affect the performance of your PPC accounts, and remember to preview your script before applying it.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained. So experiment away!

6 Ways Optmyzr’s Rule Engine Beats Google Ads Automated Rules For Flexibility

We all have repetitive PPC management tasks we wish we could automate and get off our daily to-do lists. Fortunately, there are several options for PPC advertisers to achieve this, like Google Ads’ Automated Rules, and Optmyzr’s Rule Engine.

In working with hundreds of customers in my two years at Optmyzr, I noticed many advertisers don’t explore our Rule Engine’s most powerful capabilities because they assume it’s just another interface to control Google’s Automated Rules.

Turns out there’s much more to it than that.

The Rule Engine actually enables our power users to do some of their most advanced optimizations that they wouldn’t have time for without this level of automation. 

I talked to Fred, one of our founders who shared that the Rule Engine was initially built as a script for a customer whose bid management strategy took a full day of his time every week!

The script was useful but limited to that advertiser’s strategy. So our company built the Rule Engine to allow every advertiser to automate their most powerful strategies.

While we’re fans of Google Ads Automated Rules for their simple setup, that simplicity is limiting when you want to take your account to the next level with a more powerful strategy. That’s the gap we’re solving with our Rule Engine.

Let me share 6 useful things you can do with the Optmyzr Rule Engine that you cannot with Google Ads Automated Rules.

1. Combine multiple rules into layered strategies.

Though in Google Ads you can add as many automated rules as you want, it’s not possible to combine them into a single optimization. In Optmyzr, this is possible with Rule Engine strategies.

In Optmyzr, a rule is a set of conditions and actions (if and then statements). Strategies let you combine multiple rules — in essence, letting you add the ‘else’ portion in an ‘if’, ‘then’, else’ rule.

For example, in just one strategy, you can consolidate all your search query management by adding one rule to add positive keywords and another rule to add negatives.

You can also have multiple actions applied to an entity. For example, you can add a label to the keywords your rule paused because they were found to be too expensive.

2. Use data from multiple date ranges.

Automated rules in Google Ads let you use a single date range for metrics. This makes it impossible to do relative comparisons, like to find ad groups that have a sudden spike in CPA for the past week compared to the last 30 days.

With our Rule Engine, you can bring in performance data from as many date ranges as you’d like, making relative comparisons very easy.

3. Use data from custom date ranges.

While using multiple date ranges is useful, it’s even better when you can customize those date ranges. Rather than just using default ones like the last 7/30/n days, you can build custom date ranges that are based on lookback windows.

For example, you can build a custom date range for 14 days ago to 8 days ago (week before last), and another for 7 days ago to 1 day ago (last week). This enables you to find search terms that have gained a lot of impressions in the past week compared to the week before, or ad groups that have seen a decline in CTR for a few weeks in a row.

4. Do relative comparisons of metrics across a hierarchical structure.

With our Rule Engine, you’re able to compare, in just one condition, the performance of the same metric at different levels. This comes in handy when you want to do a relative comparison using expressions/formulas.

For example, compare the CPA of one keyword versus the CPA of the campaign in which the keyword is located. Now you could do things like find keywords that are 50% more expensive than average for the campaign.

In Google Ads automated rules, you can compare a metric against a static value but not against other elements. So you can only do things like find keywords whose CPA is higher than $20. That’s not helpful when you know that CPAs vary greatly between brand and non-brand campaigns, and even between campaigns that sell different services in different locations.

By using a relative comparison, you don’t need to set a static target for all your comparisons, and it becomes very easy to simply look for outliers.

Note: You can also use expressions as actions to calculate new bids and targets.

4. Use external data.

What happens when you want to use data not available in Google Ads, but that is also important for your business and optimizations?

In Rule Engine, you can connect a Google Sheet to use your own data in your rules. You can get as creative as you want: use profit margins defined by your agency, analytics data, weather data, a list of holidays, etc.

For ideas and use cases, you can have a look at our series of blog posts Thinking Outside the Box & Do More with Optmyzr.

5. Set rules on autopilot or review them on demand.

While automations help you save tons of time, you may not always want to give up full control; this is why we also let you use your Rule Engine strategies manually. We give you everything necessary to create your own optimization tools and then run them on demand.

Following this idea, even when your strategies are running automatically, we still let you decide if you want to review the changes before you apply them. This is a huge advantage when you want to test your optimization before giving all the control to the automation.

6. Exclude recent changes.

You can avoid applying continuous changes to the same entity for a defined period of time to give them enough time to perform before it’s considered by the strategy again. This helps when you don’t want to stack bids or change the target CPA of an ad group that was already adjusted the day before.

This is particularly helpful in situations where you’re slowly changing things like bids until they meet your goal.

For example, if you automate bidding to set an ideal CPC based on the last 7 days’ conversion rate and your target CPA (new CPC = target CPA * conversion rate), you can run that rule as often as you want without worrying that your bids will get out of control.

However, the following is a riskier automation: new CPC = old CPC + $0.10 when last 7 days’ CPA is below CPA target.

It’s risky because if you run this rule 5 times per day, it will increase the bid 5 times even though the last 7 days’ CPA includes only a small portion of data since the last bid change.

With Optmyzr, you can remove this risk by excluding items that were already changed recently. Now every time the rule runs, it will only make suggestions for entities that were not already recently changed by the same rule.

The Rule Engine is my favorite, because you can tailor account rules to match what the individual client needs to be seeing for performance.

Larry C, Owner/Operator, 707 Marketing

Conclusion

If we have to sum up all of the above, it’s about two things: flexibility and more control. Which tool to use will depend on how much of your workflow you want to automate, and how much customization is required.

The Rule Engine definitely is a powerful tool that gives you much room to play with and is designed for both novice and advanced users.

Interested in learning more about it? Let support@optmyzr.com know, and we’ll be happy to help you!

Script THIS! Automate Google Ads & Bing Ads for Beginners

The Optmyzr team is fresh off an invigorating and inspiring webinar with our friends from Hanapin Marketing. I had the opportunity to present virtually alongside Jacob Fairclough, the associate director of Analytics at Hanapin and regular blogger at PPC Hero.

Jake and I spend a lot of our work life neck deep in scripting, which makes it easy to assume everyone PPC pro out there is as keen on scripting as we are.

We had a great audience of PPC pros for the webinar, and started off with an online insta-poll asking attendees to identify their biggest challenge in working with scripts. More than 90 percent of attendees indicated scripting is still a big unknown:

If you would respond more in line with the other 10%, you might already be a script-ninja. Great! Ninjas can stop reading this post and pop over to our script library to peruse the latest from our script-crafting experts. A regular browse through our latest scripts can keep your automation ahead of the game.

However, if you are like a lot of PPC pros, the notion of scripting as part of your PPC automation regimen might make you shield your eyes and run for the door. So keep reading!

PPC Automation Takes Many Forms

It’s important to understand the varying degrees of automation in PPC – and where scripts fit into the picture.

The basics:

Google Ads and Bing Ads provide basic, but essential automations that can reduce tasks for core PPC activities. Things like automated bid management. If automation is new to you, this is a good place to start.

The big engines also provide essential automation via rules. This can include automation for keyword campaigns, scheduling, termination. Google and Bing make it easy to get started automating in about five minutes. Results can be pretty striking – and perhaps start a healthy automation addiction.

The essentials:

PPC management suites, such as Optmyzr, allow PPC pros to manage virtually all aspects of their work more efficiently. Within such full suite tools are varying levels of automation and controls that can greatly elevate the effectiveness of PPC campaigns through automated bid management, implementation of rules and many other forms of automation (fear not…we’ll write extensively about deep-in-the-weeds PPC automation throughout 2019).

The advanced:

A lot of our clients regularly derive extreme value from the advanced, custom scripts our team creates on a regular basis. From budget management to URL checkers to reporting, our scripts eliminate hours of task-oriented activities, freeing up the PPC pro to focus more on the human aspects of their job – strategy, creativity and out-of-the-box thinking.

Still, there are many really smart PPC pros who perhaps only dabble lightly in our scripts to help boost their capabilities, but may still have some level of trepidation.

Finally, many clients see scripts as cryptic cave paintings – and never explore our vast array of really powerful tools that take their game to a whole new level.

If scripts seem cryptic – don’t fret. You’re not alone, and the PPC script “cave paintings” are really much easier to figure out than you might think.

PPC Scripts Deconstructed

Let’s look at Google Ads scripts – but keep in mind Bing Ads is really cut from the same cloth. Scripts that work in one platform can generally be easily adapted for the other.

Google Ad scripts are really just a flavor of JavaScript code that can be pasted into a Google Ads account. Think of formulas within spreadsheets or even a basic IFTTT sequence. If you can write something down as a process or set of commands, you actually understand coding more than you may think.

Start by examining your PPC workflow. Can something be automated? Repetitive tasks? We work in data and process flows – two key ingredients for automation and scripting. Think of the most common things surrounding managing keywords, product groups, Ads, Shopping Ads, bid adjustments. So much of what we do can be boiled down to a process. Processes SCREAM “automate me!”

The next question to ask yourself is – SHOULD this be automated? The chart below helps us prioritize opportunities to automate via scripts and what we may want to keep as is or perhaps automate at a later date.

The key question: What keeps you the busiest? Plot your responses on a basic X-Y grid diagram where the X-axis scales according to time consumption and the Y-axis focuses on task frequency. For me, I find ad testing – explored manually – happens a lot and takes a ton of time. Bid management happens a lot, but is relatively quick to do. Reporting takes a lot of time, but happens predictably and not as frequently. Budget updates can be done quickly and don’t happen as frequently.

Now we have a great visual representation to prioritize what can/should be automated.

Whatever priorities you come up with, chances are we have easily-adapted scripts ready made for you in our script library. If you can master “control-C” and “control-V,” you are already on your way. The steps are pretty simple:

  1. Copy the free script you want from our script library
  2. Paste the script into your Google Ads manager (same for Bing scripts)
  3. Revise the few specific lines of code that need to be customized (easier than it may sound at first)
  4. Test/preview
  5. Launch

Okay…step 3 in the sequence above still may seem daunting, but it’s not. In reality, most PPC pros can master this step fairly quickly. You really only need to adjust some configuration in the code. Simple things such as replacing email address for notification – or adjust specific parameters that you want the script to monitor, such as triggering based on a specific percentage of budget or other specific performance data.

Reality is there may be hundreds of lines of code in a script that you copy and paste, but you need only adjust a few lines for the commands and actions you want. After you try it a few times, it becomes really easy to do.

Scripts have their place (and not)

Scripts clearly can be great tools to use, but like everything, they have limitations. For example, they can only run 30 minutes at a time and they have limits on parameters such as numbers of keywords. Advanced script ninjas will often go a level deeper into crafting robust APIs for more advanced programming that goes beyond the limitations of scripts. But for now, it’s most essential to get comfortable with scripts if this is new turf for you. �

The results can be astounding. Breaking complex tasks down to smaller components allows machines to focus on the tasks and the humans to focus on more esoteric, strategic aspects of PPC. Creativity in words or imagery for Shopping Ads – or perhaps planning out seasonal/timely campaigns that require the human mind to break new ground. Machines are getting smarter, but they simply can’t compete with the human mind on many levels still.

Automate like it’s 2019!

PPC Automation has made huge strides in recent years and we expect that trend gain speed in 2019. Scripts are one piece of what should be a more holistic approach to automation. �

Hopefully we’ve broken down some of the natural barriers many great PPC pros find when they think about scripting. Start small. If you are an agency, test on your internal campaigns and get comfortable. You’ll see that scripts are pretty foolproof, easy to debug when they aren’t working right, and open new doors to become the PPC rockstar you’re destined to be.

Conclusion

Coming up in January, we’re going to run a run little contest with our friends at Hanapin. We’ll ask PPC pros what they want to automate via scripts. Based on your feedback, we’ll build the most sought after script and post it free here and on PPCHero.com.

Submit your script idea!

Jake and I will revisit scripts even more in depth at PPC Hero Summit on Wednesday, March 6th. The event will offer a great opportunity to add scripting as part of a holistic approach to PPC automation.

In the meantime, start exploring scripts! They can help transform your effectiveness as a true PPC rockstar.

How Keyword Match Types Work With Close Variants (2018)

Keyword match types have long existed as a way for advertisers on Google and Bing to define how closely a user’s query has to match a keyword before it can trigger an ad to show.

Match types allow advertisers to either tightly control exactly what searches their ads may appear for (through exact match keywords) or to give a lot of control to Google’s Machine Learning to decide when the ad might be relevant to a search, even if it doesn’t contain any of the words in the keyword (through broad match keywords).

Because Google says that approximately 15% of searches that happen every day are unique (i.e. that same query has not been seen in the past 90 days), they believe that advertisers who restrict their keywords too much will miss out on a lot of relevant traffic. Their point is valid.

At the same time, broad match has a reputation for sometimes being a bit too quick to show ads and causing irrelevant clicks and that has led some advertisers to stop using broad match all together. While they’re more in control, they miss significant opportunities, and Google is missing the opportunity to monetize.

Close Variants

So Google started to look for a solution and in 2014� they introduced the notion of ‘close variants’. In a 2017� update, ‘close variants’ were updated and by then could encompass plurals, singulars, misspellings, stemmings, or the addition or removal of function words.

Keywords of ANY match type can be mutated through the ‘close variant’ algorithm. Through this change, advertisers can benefit from a tightly controlled exact match keyword without needing to add additional exact match keywords for very minor variations, i.e. close variants.

2018 Close Variant Update

In the most recent 2018 update, close variants were again redefined and they can now behave in one of 2 ways depending on the match type:

For any positive keyword type, except ‘exact’, a close variant can be:

  1. A typo
  2. The plural or singular
  3. A stemming
  4. The word with function words added or removed

For exact match keywords, close variants can be all the above PLUS one more:

  1. A string that indicates the same intent

Think of a close variant as the ability for Google to take any string of words in your keyword and replace it with one of the variations described above. If that new keyword is eligible to show an ad in the match type chosen by the advertiser, the keyword will enter the ad auction.

There is one further change that is worth noting. The word order in exact match keywords used to matter. In the 2017 close variant update, word order for exact matches could be changed.

Because match types are more complicated to understand due to the existence of close variants, we’ve created a table to explain how match types work as of the launch of the October 2018 close variant update.

Close Variant AdWords Script

We’ve also created a free AdWords Script that will help you do an analysis of how close variants are impacting your account. Simply copy-and-paste this into a single account’s AdWords Scripts section and run it to get a Google Sheet showing how your keywords have been changed by close variants.

Get the script here:

Watch our instruction video on how to use the script:

Close Variant Automated Rule

Subscribers of Optmyzr can also try our Predefined Recipe in the Rule Engine called “Close Variant Performance for Exact Match Keywords” to get a similar report. This predefined recipe can easily be updated to automatically add negative keywords if the query proves to be significantly underperforming the underlying keyword.

A script to put any AdWords data in a spreadsheet

Optmyzr’s Rule Based Optimizations recently added the ability to integrate with any 3rd party data through Google spreadsheets. By connecting call conversion data, CRM data, internal business data, or data about pretty much anything else, advertisers can now build some really cool optimizations of their own. Even the classic Bid By Weather use case that has been so heavily promoted through AdWords Scripts can now be implemented by advertisers using Optmyzr without writing any code.

To help advertisers create their spreadsheets for some of the more common use cases, like bidding by conversion name or type, we wrote a simple AdWords Script that can pull any AdWords data into a spreadsheet and keep it updated as often as hourly. This spreadsheet can then be linked to a Rule-Based Optimization in Optmyzr so it’s always ready to run an optimization with the right data.

Automatically Put Raw AdWords Data In a Spreadsheet

Even if you’re not planning to use this script to automate your account management, it is still useful if you need a way to get a lot of raw AdWords data into a spreadsheet. It can also be a great supplement to current Optmyzr reports which are more focused on showing the highlights of an account and presenting insights that a stakeholder rather than a PPC practitioner might find useful.

The script can fetch multiple AdWords reports and add them as different spreadsheets or different tabs in the same spreadsheet.

How to Use the Script

For each report you want to add in a spreadsheet you’ll need to have one section of the code that specifies the query, spreadsheet URL, tab name, and report version. Our sample version already includes a few sample queries but let our support team know if you need help crafting another query.

Queries to Put AdWords Reports in Spreadsheet
These are the settings you need to modify to put the right AdWords data into the spreadsheet you want.

You can modify the following variables with your settings:

To run this code, simply add it as a new script in AdWords and schedule it. Most likely you’ll just need to schedule this to run once a day, early in the day.

Resources

  1. The AdWords reporting API lists available reports and fields. Use this to find what report to use for the data you need. Also use it to find which data you can combine in one report. Note that some types of data are not compatible, like ‘ConversionCategoryName’, and ‘Clicks’.
  2. The AWQL guide explains how to construct a query. Note that even though AWQL supports ordering and limiting of results, this functionality is not available when using AWQL inside AdWords scripts. This means that your report will include all results in no particular order and when you run the same report again, the order of results may change.

Sample Queries

The following sample queries are compatible with reportVersion v201710

A breakdown of conversion types for all converting keywords in AdWords in the last 30 days:

'SELECT AdGroupId, Id, Conversions, ConversionCategoryName ' +
     'FROM   KEYWORDS_PERFORMANCE_REPORT ' +
     'DURING LAST_30_DAYS'

A breakdown of conversion names for all converting keywords in AdWords in the last 30 days:

'SELECT AdGroupId, Id, Conversions, ConversionTypeName ' +
     'FROM   KEYWORDS_PERFORMANCE_REPORT ' +
     'DURING LAST_30_DAYS'

The Script

Tools to Create Expanded Text Ads in AdWords

AdWords introduced expanded text ads (ETAs) last year and promised higher click-through rates for advertisers and a better experience for users. In continuation to the announcement, AdWords removed the option to create standard text ads on 31st January 2017. Following which advertisers have either completely moved to ETAs or are in the process of doing so. To smoothen the transition, AdWords automatically added ETAs to accounts, which gave� users the option to� test out performance of ETAs but offered little control over the ad text. � Optmyzr has solutions to help you create ETAs at scale in your AdWords account while maintaining control over the ad copy.� You can create ETAs from a spreadsheet as well as from existing standard text ads. I’ve listed three tools in Optmyzr that support creation of ETAs.

#1 Generate Text Ad Bulksheets Enhanced Script

Creating ETAs from scratch can be very time consuming especially if you have many campaigns in your account. The Generate Text Ad Bulksheets Enhanced Script helps in creating new ads based on performance of existing ads. For example, you can pick a metric like CTR and use it as a benchmark for creating new ETAs that can be quickly uploaded to AdWords. This video explains how this script can be used for creating ETAs via bulk uploads or the AdWords Editor.

#2 AB Testing for Ads

The AB Testing for Ads optimization compares performance of legacy ads (old text ads) with new ETAs and it lets you pause losing ads with a single click. It also lets you create new ETAs to populate ad groups and continue testing ads. To make it easy, it recommends high performing headlines and description lines that can be easily combined to create new ads. Pro Tip: Use the Turbo Mode to view all active ads in ad groups and to quickly create new ETAs across ad groups.

#3 Create Ads from Spreadsheet Enhanced Script

Well, that’s not all. If you are looking to create fresh ETAs in a campaign, you can use the Create Ads from Spreadsheet Enhanced Script. Using this script you can use data from a spreadsheet to create new ads, keywords and ad groups. This video shows how this script lets you easily automate the creation of ads from a spreadsheet. You don’t need any coding skills to implement this.

Not sure which ad groups don’t have ETAs? Use the audit widgets in Optmyzr to find ad groups with less than ‘n’ ETAs. Read more about how to use these widgets here.

If you don’t have an Optmyzr account, you can sign up for a free 14-day trial of Optmyzr’s tools to try out these tools � 🙂

Is Your Account Showing Automatic Ads

Google has started automatically adding new ad variations to AdWords accounts. While I believe this will benefit the majority of advertisers who don’t manage their accounts very actively, this is a scary thought for the typical ad agency, or advanced PPC account manager who does a lot of controlled experimentation.

Right now only about 2,000 accounts are in the experiment and they’ve all been notified by email. If you want to check whether any of your accounts have already been added, or if you want to automate checking in the future, I wrote a new AdWords Script to help.

Simply grab the code and copy-and-paste it into the AdWords Scripts section of your MCC account. Here’s our help article on how to install an AdWords Script.

If you want to get an email if your account has active ads with the label “Added by AdWords”, add your email address in the line that says:

var EMAIL = “”;

Then schedule the script to run daily or weekly and get an email as soon as we detect there are automatically added ads in the account.

You can grab the code here:

Free Script For Expanded Text Ads

Expanded Text Ads (ETAs) from Google AdWords are now available for all advertisers to create. To help everyone who’s too busy to write thousands of new ads but� who still wants to make the transition quickly we’ve just released a new free AdWords Script.

The script uses your landing pages’ meta tags to make suggestions for the new longer ad components. The title tag gets split into 2 lines of ad headlines and the meta description’s first 80 characters become the basis of the ad description line.

The script outputs a Google Sheet that can be imported into the AdWords Editor after you make any final tweaks to your ETAs.

You can read more about it on Search Engine Land.

The AdWords Script

Copy the code into your own AdWords account and give it a try:

Step-by-step for Using AdWords Scripts

If you’ve not worked with AdWords Scripts yet, this is a great way to get your feet wet. The script simply outputs a spreadsheet of data and makes no changes to your account so it’s a very low-risk way to try things out. Here is a quick step-by-step:

AdWords-Scripts-How-To-1

AdWords-Scripts-How-To-2

AdWords-Scripts-How-To-3

AdWords-Scripts-How-To-4

Try Some Other AdWords Scripts

We have lots of� other scripts to try and they’re all on our patent pending Enhanced Scripts™� platform so that the code will work equally well on MCC and child accounts, you can maintain multiple settings per account, easily maintain different settings different� accounts, and most importantly, all without ever touching a single line of code. If you can copy-and-paste, you can use our� Enhanced Scripts™ for AdWords.

Regular Pages

PPC Town Hall 18: Grow your business with PPC scripts

PPC marketers are always optimizing — some monitoring here, an adjustment there, and then you start to see (better) results. When you have that much to do, it’s impossible to do it manually and scale your output.

So there’s no reason to fear automation — like scripts. They not only speed up the process, but also allow you to be much more efficient in running your business. That’s right — scripts can drive business impact.

Best of all, anyone can use scripts, even if you haven’t written even a single line of code in your life!

So this week on episode 18 of PPC Town Hall, we spoke to our panelists who live and breathe scripts:

As always, you can view this week’s episode as well as previous editions of PPC Town Hall right here.

Here are 5 insights to help you grow your business by automating your PPC accounts with scripts.

1. Update price extensions

Nils: Price extensions are very popular extensions that you can use in your Google Ads accounts to display actual prices. But prices tend to change quite often. If you have different products, and the product manager or account manager is changing the prices of the products because of inventory or competition, you need to update the price extensions with the actual prices.

Up until a year ago, it was impossible to update them through scripts. Fortunately, now we can access the price extensions via the scripts API to keep them in sync with your inventory.

To check the price extensions, you need to do the following: Google Ads scripts → References → AdsApp → Ad Extensions → Prices.

2. When to turn to scripts

Steve: ‘This is taking too much manual work’ is the point where we begin to think about building scripts to shorten the whole process. Most of the time, it’s brought up due to some amount of laziness on our part. For example, I’m currently working on Search Query reports and rely on scripts to deliver automated reports to me.

One of the best things about scripts is that you get to see this functionality and dozens of ways one can apply that across campaigns. The fun of scripts is finding something and imagining creative ways to apply them.

3. The business value of scripts

Nils: Scripts deliver great benefits all over the place. I’ve created a list of the Top 7 benefits of using scripts. Personally I try to automate as much as possible by using scripts. It has helped my remote PPC agency succeed and apply consistent processes to operations. With scripts, you can come up with new ideas to test your account, which wouldn’t have been possible manually. For example, we know that N-gram analysis is very tedious and time-taking. But with scripts, something that complex becomes quicker and can be done more frequently.    

The biggest benefit of scripts for my agency has been quality assurance. As the scripts are monitoring everything, any mistake done by my team comes under notice quickly. This way I can be alerted when anything goes haywire and sleep easy.  

Steve: We recently shifted to a new revenue model — cost per deliverable, where we charge our customers a fixed amount for our services. Scripts allow me to do that a lot more efficiently.

It’s not a discussion of hours anymore. Our clients are more focused on whether the product runs efficiently rather than how. This allows me to take my expertise and focus on deliverables rather than time.

4. Copy-pasting and modifying scripts

Steve: I think in blocks, which is basically the JavaScript way of thinking. Figuring out which functions do what, and letting them flow through until you get all the pieces for the script. In a lot of cases, you will get pre-built scripts to work on.

For example, Google’s Account Anomaly script is very easy to adjust to things that you are looking for in your anomalies. This can be a good base to get started with scripts.

5. Using scripts to monitor Google’s AI

Nils: We know that Google AI uses machine learning to predict performances on clicks. And machine learnings involves a ‘learning phase’. We are basically providing Google money and data to feed it to the machine learning algorithms. This is where I love to use scripts to track how AI is handling my accounts. If it goes haywire, and does a bad job for my clients my scripts would alert me immediately.

For example, for close variants, I have created a script to monitor the performance of the real keyword against the close variant. If there’s a significant difference in the performance, like in CPA or ROAS, I get alerted of that. You need to layer scripts and Google’s AI to make the most of it.

Conclusion

It’s important to look at Google Ads holistically. Everything — bids, budgets, ad text — influences this interconnected system. It’s not enough to set a script and forget it; you have to monitor it periodically as well.

Start out by using Google’s repository of pre-built scripts, or Nils’ collection of over 250 ready-to-use scripts.

As you gain experience, you can try modifying them to suit your specific needs. Experiment with existing rules to see how they affect the performance of your PPC accounts, and remember to preview your script before applying it.

Nothing ventured, nothing gained. So experiment away!

6 Ways Optmyzr’s Rule Engine Beats Google Ads Automated Rules For Flexibility

We all have repetitive PPC management tasks we wish we could automate and get off our daily to-do lists. Fortunately, there are several options for PPC advertisers to achieve this, like Google Ads’ Automated Rules, and Optmyzr’s Rule Engine.

In working with hundreds of customers in my two years at Optmyzr, I noticed many advertisers don’t explore our Rule Engine’s most powerful capabilities because they assume it’s just another interface to control Google’s Automated Rules.

Turns out there’s much more to it than that.

The Rule Engine actually enables our power users to do some of their most advanced optimizations that they wouldn’t have time for without this level of automation. 

I talked to Fred, one of our founders who shared that the Rule Engine was initially built as a script for a customer whose bid management strategy took a full day of his time every week!

The script was useful but limited to that advertiser’s strategy. So our company built the Rule Engine to allow every advertiser to automate their most powerful strategies.

While we’re fans of Google Ads Automated Rules for their simple setup, that simplicity is limiting when you want to take your account to the next level with a more powerful strategy. That’s the gap we’re solving with our Rule Engine.

Let me share 6 useful things you can do with the Optmyzr Rule Engine that you cannot with Google Ads Automated Rules.

1. Combine multiple rules into layered strategies.

Though in Google Ads you can add as many automated rules as you want, it’s not possible to combine them into a single optimization. In Optmyzr, this is possible with Rule Engine strategies.

In Optmyzr, a rule is a set of conditions and actions (if and then statements). Strategies let you combine multiple rules — in essence, letting you add the ‘else’ portion in an ‘if’, ‘then’, else’ rule.

For example, in just one strategy, you can consolidate all your search query management by adding one rule to add positive keywords and another rule to add negatives.

You can also have multiple actions applied to an entity. For example, you can add a label to the keywords your rule paused because they were found to be too expensive.

2. Use data from multiple date ranges.

Automated rules in Google Ads let you use a single date range for metrics. This makes it impossible to do relative comparisons, like to find ad groups that have a sudden spike in CPA for the past week compared to the last 30 days.

With our Rule Engine, you can bring in performance data from as many date ranges as you’d like, making relative comparisons very easy.

3. Use data from custom date ranges.

While using multiple date ranges is useful, it’s even better when you can customize those date ranges. Rather than just using default ones like the last 7/30/n days, you can build custom date ranges that are based on lookback windows.

For example, you can build a custom date range for 14 days ago to 8 days ago (week before last), and another for 7 days ago to 1 day ago (last week). This enables you to find search terms that have gained a lot of impressions in the past week compared to the week before, or ad groups that have seen a decline in CTR for a few weeks in a row.

4. Do relative comparisons of metrics across a hierarchical structure.

With our Rule Engine, you’re able to compare, in just one condition, the performance of the same metric at different levels. This comes in handy when you want to do a relative comparison using expressions/formulas.

For example, compare the CPA of one keyword versus the CPA of the campaign in which the keyword is located. Now you could do things like find keywords that are 50% more expensive than average for the campaign.

In Google Ads automated rules, you can compare a metric against a static value but not against other elements. So you can only do things like find keywords whose CPA is higher than $20. That’s not helpful when you know that CPAs vary greatly between brand and non-brand campaigns, and even between campaigns that sell different services in different locations.

By using a relative comparison, you don’t need to set a static target for all your comparisons, and it becomes very easy to simply look for outliers.

Note: You can also use expressions as actions to calculate new bids and targets.

4. Use external data.

What happens when you want to use data not available in Google Ads, but that is also important for your business and optimizations?

In Rule Engine, you can connect a Google Sheet to use your own data in your rules. You can get as creative as you want: use profit margins defined by your agency, analytics data, weather data, a list of holidays, etc.

For ideas and use cases, you can have a look at our series of blog posts Thinking Outside the Box & Do More with Optmyzr.

5. Set rules on autopilot or review them on demand.

While automations help you save tons of time, you may not always want to give up full control; this is why we also let you use your Rule Engine strategies manually. We give you everything necessary to create your own optimization tools and then run them on demand.

Following this idea, even when your strategies are running automatically, we still let you decide if you want to review the changes before you apply them. This is a huge advantage when you want to test your optimization before giving all the control to the automation.

6. Exclude recent changes.

You can avoid applying continuous changes to the same entity for a defined period of time to give them enough time to perform before it’s considered by the strategy again. This helps when you don’t want to stack bids or change the target CPA of an ad group that was already adjusted the day before.

This is particularly helpful in situations where you’re slowly changing things like bids until they meet your goal.

For example, if you automate bidding to set an ideal CPC based on the last 7 days’ conversion rate and your target CPA (new CPC = target CPA * conversion rate), you can run that rule as often as you want without worrying that your bids will get out of control.

However, the following is a riskier automation: new CPC = old CPC + $0.10 when last 7 days’ CPA is below CPA target.

It’s risky because if you run this rule 5 times per day, it will increase the bid 5 times even though the last 7 days’ CPA includes only a small portion of data since the last bid change.

With Optmyzr, you can remove this risk by excluding items that were already changed recently. Now every time the rule runs, it will only make suggestions for entities that were not already recently changed by the same rule.

The Rule Engine is my favorite, because you can tailor account rules to match what the individual client needs to be seeing for performance.

Larry C, Owner/Operator, 707 Marketing

Conclusion

If we have to sum up all of the above, it’s about two things: flexibility and more control. Which tool to use will depend on how much of your workflow you want to automate, and how much customization is required.

The Rule Engine definitely is a powerful tool that gives you much room to play with and is designed for both novice and advanced users.

Interested in learning more about it? Let support@optmyzr.com know, and we’ll be happy to help you!

Script THIS! Automate Google Ads & Bing Ads for Beginners

The Optmyzr team is fresh off an invigorating and inspiring webinar with our friends from Hanapin Marketing. I had the opportunity to present virtually alongside Jacob Fairclough, the associate director of Analytics at Hanapin and regular blogger at PPC Hero.

Jake and I spend a lot of our work life neck deep in scripting, which makes it easy to assume everyone PPC pro out there is as keen on scripting as we are.

We had a great audience of PPC pros for the webinar, and started off with an online insta-poll asking attendees to identify their biggest challenge in working with scripts. More than 90 percent of attendees indicated scripting is still a big unknown:

If you would respond more in line with the other 10%, you might already be a script-ninja. Great! Ninjas can stop reading this post and pop over to our script library to peruse the latest from our script-crafting experts. A regular browse through our latest scripts can keep your automation ahead of the game.

However, if you are like a lot of PPC pros, the notion of scripting as part of your PPC automation regimen might make you shield your eyes and run for the door. So keep reading!

PPC Automation Takes Many Forms

It’s important to understand the varying degrees of automation in PPC – and where scripts fit into the picture.

The basics:

Google Ads and Bing Ads provide basic, but essential automations that can reduce tasks for core PPC activities. Things like automated bid management. If automation is new to you, this is a good place to start.

The big engines also provide essential automation via rules. This can include automation for keyword campaigns, scheduling, termination. Google and Bing make it easy to get started automating in about five minutes. Results can be pretty striking – and perhaps start a healthy automation addiction.

The essentials:

PPC management suites, such as Optmyzr, allow PPC pros to manage virtually all aspects of their work more efficiently. Within such full suite tools are varying levels of automation and controls that can greatly elevate the effectiveness of PPC campaigns through automated bid management, implementation of rules and many other forms of automation (fear not…we’ll write extensively about deep-in-the-weeds PPC automation throughout 2019).

The advanced:

A lot of our clients regularly derive extreme value from the advanced, custom scripts our team creates on a regular basis. From budget management to URL checkers to reporting, our scripts eliminate hours of task-oriented activities, freeing up the PPC pro to focus more on the human aspects of their job – strategy, creativity and out-of-the-box thinking.

Still, there are many really smart PPC pros who perhaps only dabble lightly in our scripts to help boost their capabilities, but may still have some level of trepidation.

Finally, many clients see scripts as cryptic cave paintings – and never explore our vast array of really powerful tools that take their game to a whole new level.

If scripts seem cryptic – don’t fret. You’re not alone, and the PPC script “cave paintings” are really much easier to figure out than you might think.

PPC Scripts Deconstructed

Let’s look at Google Ads scripts – but keep in mind Bing Ads is really cut from the same cloth. Scripts that work in one platform can generally be easily adapted for the other.

Google Ad scripts are really just a flavor of JavaScript code that can be pasted into a Google Ads account. Think of formulas within spreadsheets or even a basic IFTTT sequence. If you can write something down as a process or set of commands, you actually understand coding more than you may think.

Start by examining your PPC workflow. Can something be automated? Repetitive tasks? We work in data and process flows – two key ingredients for automation and scripting. Think of the most common things surrounding managing keywords, product groups, Ads, Shopping Ads, bid adjustments. So much of what we do can be boiled down to a process. Processes SCREAM “automate me!”

The next question to ask yourself is – SHOULD this be automated? The chart below helps us prioritize opportunities to automate via scripts and what we may want to keep as is or perhaps automate at a later date.

The key question: What keeps you the busiest? Plot your responses on a basic X-Y grid diagram where the X-axis scales according to time consumption and the Y-axis focuses on task frequency. For me, I find ad testing – explored manually – happens a lot and takes a ton of time. Bid management happens a lot, but is relatively quick to do. Reporting takes a lot of time, but happens predictably and not as frequently. Budget updates can be done quickly and don’t happen as frequently.

Now we have a great visual representation to prioritize what can/should be automated.

Whatever priorities you come up with, chances are we have easily-adapted scripts ready made for you in our script library. If you can master “control-C” and “control-V,” you are already on your way. The steps are pretty simple:

  1. Copy the free script you want from our script library
  2. Paste the script into your Google Ads manager (same for Bing scripts)
  3. Revise the few specific lines of code that need to be customized (easier than it may sound at first)
  4. Test/preview
  5. Launch

Okay…step 3 in the sequence above still may seem daunting, but it’s not. In reality, most PPC pros can master this step fairly quickly. You really only need to adjust some configuration in the code. Simple things such as replacing email address for notification – or adjust specific parameters that you want the script to monitor, such as triggering based on a specific percentage of budget or other specific performance data.

Reality is there may be hundreds of lines of code in a script that you copy and paste, but you need only adjust a few lines for the commands and actions you want. After you try it a few times, it becomes really easy to do.

Scripts have their place (and not)

Scripts clearly can be great tools to use, but like everything, they have limitations. For example, they can only run 30 minutes at a time and they have limits on parameters such as numbers of keywords. Advanced script ninjas will often go a level deeper into crafting robust APIs for more advanced programming that goes beyond the limitations of scripts. But for now, it’s most essential to get comfortable with scripts if this is new turf for you. �

The results can be astounding. Breaking complex tasks down to smaller components allows machines to focus on the tasks and the humans to focus on more esoteric, strategic aspects of PPC. Creativity in words or imagery for Shopping Ads – or perhaps planning out seasonal/timely campaigns that require the human mind to break new ground. Machines are getting smarter, but they simply can’t compete with the human mind on many levels still.

Automate like it’s 2019!

PPC Automation has made huge strides in recent years and we expect that trend gain speed in 2019. Scripts are one piece of what should be a more holistic approach to automation. �

Hopefully we’ve broken down some of the natural barriers many great PPC pros find when they think about scripting. Start small. If you are an agency, test on your internal campaigns and get comfortable. You’ll see that scripts are pretty foolproof, easy to debug when they aren’t working right, and open new doors to become the PPC rockstar you’re destined to be.

Conclusion

Coming up in January, we’re going to run a run little contest with our friends at Hanapin. We’ll ask PPC pros what they want to automate via scripts. Based on your feedback, we’ll build the most sought after script and post it free here and on PPCHero.com.

Submit your script idea!

Jake and I will revisit scripts even more in depth at PPC Hero Summit on Wednesday, March 6th. The event will offer a great opportunity to add scripting as part of a holistic approach to PPC automation.

In the meantime, start exploring scripts! They can help transform your effectiveness as a true PPC rockstar.

How Keyword Match Types Work With Close Variants (2018)

Keyword match types have long existed as a way for advertisers on Google and Bing to define how closely a user’s query has to match a keyword before it can trigger an ad to show.

Match types allow advertisers to either tightly control exactly what searches their ads may appear for (through exact match keywords) or to give a lot of control to Google’s Machine Learning to decide when the ad might be relevant to a search, even if it doesn’t contain any of the words in the keyword (through broad match keywords).

Because Google says that approximately 15% of searches that happen every day are unique (i.e. that same query has not been seen in the past 90 days), they believe that advertisers who restrict their keywords too much will miss out on a lot of relevant traffic. Their point is valid.

At the same time, broad match has a reputation for sometimes being a bit too quick to show ads and causing irrelevant clicks and that has led some advertisers to stop using broad match all together. While they’re more in control, they miss significant opportunities, and Google is missing the opportunity to monetize.

Close Variants

So Google started to look for a solution and in 2014� they introduced the notion of ‘close variants’. In a 2017� update, ‘close variants’ were updated and by then could encompass plurals, singulars, misspellings, stemmings, or the addition or removal of function words.

Keywords of ANY match type can be mutated through the ‘close variant’ algorithm. Through this change, advertisers can benefit from a tightly controlled exact match keyword without needing to add additional exact match keywords for very minor variations, i.e. close variants.

2018 Close Variant Update

In the most recent 2018 update, close variants were again redefined and they can now behave in one of 2 ways depending on the match type:

For any positive keyword type, except ‘exact’, a close variant can be:

  1. A typo
  2. The plural or singular
  3. A stemming
  4. The word with function words added or removed

For exact match keywords, close variants can be all the above PLUS one more:

  1. A string that indicates the same intent

Think of a close variant as the ability for Google to take any string of words in your keyword and replace it with one of the variations described above. If that new keyword is eligible to show an ad in the match type chosen by the advertiser, the keyword will enter the ad auction.

There is one further change that is worth noting. The word order in exact match keywords used to matter. In the 2017 close variant update, word order for exact matches could be changed.

Because match types are more complicated to understand due to the existence of close variants, we’ve created a table to explain how match types work as of the launch of the October 2018 close variant update.

Close Variant AdWords Script

We’ve also created a free AdWords Script that will help you do an analysis of how close variants are impacting your account. Simply copy-and-paste this into a single account’s AdWords Scripts section and run it to get a Google Sheet showing how your keywords have been changed by close variants.

Get the script here:

Watch our instruction video on how to use the script:

Close Variant Automated Rule

Subscribers of Optmyzr can also try our Predefined Recipe in the Rule Engine called “Close Variant Performance for Exact Match Keywords” to get a similar report. This predefined recipe can easily be updated to automatically add negative keywords if the query proves to be significantly underperforming the underlying keyword.

A script to put any AdWords data in a spreadsheet

Optmyzr’s Rule Based Optimizations recently added the ability to integrate with any 3rd party data through Google spreadsheets. By connecting call conversion data, CRM data, internal business data, or data about pretty much anything else, advertisers can now build some really cool optimizations of their own. Even the classic Bid By Weather use case that has been so heavily promoted through AdWords Scripts can now be implemented by advertisers using Optmyzr without writing any code.

To help advertisers create their spreadsheets for some of the more common use cases, like bidding by conversion name or type, we wrote a simple AdWords Script that can pull any AdWords data into a spreadsheet and keep it updated as often as hourly. This spreadsheet can then be linked to a Rule-Based Optimization in Optmyzr so it’s always ready to run an optimization with the right data.

Automatically Put Raw AdWords Data In a Spreadsheet

Even if you’re not planning to use this script to automate your account management, it is still useful if you need a way to get a lot of raw AdWords data into a spreadsheet. It can also be a great supplement to current Optmyzr reports which are more focused on showing the highlights of an account and presenting insights that a stakeholder rather than a PPC practitioner might find useful.

The script can fetch multiple AdWords reports and add them as different spreadsheets or different tabs in the same spreadsheet.

How to Use the Script

For each report you want to add in a spreadsheet you’ll need to have one section of the code that specifies the query, spreadsheet URL, tab name, and report version. Our sample version already includes a few sample queries but let our support team know if you need help crafting another query.

Queries to Put AdWords Reports in Spreadsheet
These are the settings you need to modify to put the right AdWords data into the spreadsheet you want.

You can modify the following variables with your settings:

To run this code, simply add it as a new script in AdWords and schedule it. Most likely you’ll just need to schedule this to run once a day, early in the day.

Resources

  1. The AdWords reporting API lists available reports and fields. Use this to find what report to use for the data you need. Also use it to find which data you can combine in one report. Note that some types of data are not compatible, like ‘ConversionCategoryName’, and ‘Clicks’.
  2. The AWQL guide explains how to construct a query. Note that even though AWQL supports ordering and limiting of results, this functionality is not available when using AWQL inside AdWords scripts. This means that your report will include all results in no particular order and when you run the same report again, the order of results may change.

Sample Queries

The following sample queries are compatible with reportVersion v201710

A breakdown of conversion types for all converting keywords in AdWords in the last 30 days:

'SELECT AdGroupId, Id, Conversions, ConversionCategoryName ' +
     'FROM   KEYWORDS_PERFORMANCE_REPORT ' +
     'DURING LAST_30_DAYS'

A breakdown of conversion names for all converting keywords in AdWords in the last 30 days:

'SELECT AdGroupId, Id, Conversions, ConversionTypeName ' +
     'FROM   KEYWORDS_PERFORMANCE_REPORT ' +
     'DURING LAST_30_DAYS'

The Script

Tools to Create Expanded Text Ads in AdWords

AdWords introduced expanded text ads (ETAs) last year and promised higher click-through rates for advertisers and a better experience for users. In continuation to the announcement, AdWords removed the option to create standard text ads on 31st January 2017. Following which advertisers have either completely moved to ETAs or are in the process of doing so. To smoothen the transition, AdWords automatically added ETAs to accounts, which gave� users the option to� test out performance of ETAs but offered little control over the ad text. � Optmyzr has solutions to help you create ETAs at scale in your AdWords account while maintaining control over the ad copy.� You can create ETAs from a spreadsheet as well as from existing standard text ads. I’ve listed three tools in Optmyzr that support creation of ETAs.

#1 Generate Text Ad Bulksheets Enhanced Script

Creating ETAs from scratch can be very time consuming especially if you have many campaigns in your account. The Generate Text Ad Bulksheets Enhanced Script helps in creating new ads based on performance of existing ads. For example, you can pick a metric like CTR and use it as a benchmark for creating new ETAs that can be quickly uploaded to AdWords. This video explains how this script can be used for creating ETAs via bulk uploads or the AdWords Editor.

#2 AB Testing for Ads

The AB Testing for Ads optimization compares performance of legacy ads (old text ads) with new ETAs and it lets you pause losing ads with a single click. It also lets you create new ETAs to populate ad groups and continue testing ads. To make it easy, it recommends high performing headlines and description lines that can be easily combined to create new ads. Pro Tip: Use the Turbo Mode to view all active ads in ad groups and to quickly create new ETAs across ad groups.

#3 Create Ads from Spreadsheet Enhanced Script

Well, that’s not all. If you are looking to create fresh ETAs in a campaign, you can use the Create Ads from Spreadsheet Enhanced Script. Using this script you can use data from a spreadsheet to create new ads, keywords and ad groups. This video shows how this script lets you easily automate the creation of ads from a spreadsheet. You don’t need any coding skills to implement this.

Not sure which ad groups don’t have ETAs? Use the audit widgets in Optmyzr to find ad groups with less than ‘n’ ETAs. Read more about how to use these widgets here.

If you don’t have an Optmyzr account, you can sign up for a free 14-day trial of Optmyzr’s tools to try out these tools � 🙂

Is Your Account Showing Automatic Ads

Google has started automatically adding new ad variations to AdWords accounts. While I believe this will benefit the majority of advertisers who don’t manage their accounts very actively, this is a scary thought for the typical ad agency, or advanced PPC account manager who does a lot of controlled experimentation.

Right now only about 2,000 accounts are in the experiment and they’ve all been notified by email. If you want to check whether any of your accounts have already been added, or if you want to automate checking in the future, I wrote a new AdWords Script to help.

Simply grab the code and copy-and-paste it into the AdWords Scripts section of your MCC account. Here’s our help article on how to install an AdWords Script.

If you want to get an email if your account has active ads with the label “Added by AdWords”, add your email address in the line that says:

var EMAIL = “”;

Then schedule the script to run daily or weekly and get an email as soon as we detect there are automatically added ads in the account.

You can grab the code here:

Free Script For Expanded Text Ads

Expanded Text Ads (ETAs) from Google AdWords are now available for all advertisers to create. To help everyone who’s too busy to write thousands of new ads but� who still wants to make the transition quickly we’ve just released a new free AdWords Script.

The script uses your landing pages’ meta tags to make suggestions for the new longer ad components. The title tag gets split into 2 lines of ad headlines and the meta description’s first 80 characters become the basis of the ad description line.

The script outputs a Google Sheet that can be imported into the AdWords Editor after you make any final tweaks to your ETAs.

You can read more about it on Search Engine Land.

The AdWords Script

Copy the code into your own AdWords account and give it a try:

Step-by-step for Using AdWords Scripts

If you’ve not worked with AdWords Scripts yet, this is a great way to get your feet wet. The script simply outputs a spreadsheet of data and makes no changes to your account so it’s a very low-risk way to try things out. Here is a quick step-by-step:

AdWords-Scripts-How-To-1

AdWords-Scripts-How-To-2

AdWords-Scripts-How-To-3

AdWords-Scripts-How-To-4

Try Some Other AdWords Scripts

We have lots of� other scripts to try and they’re all on our patent pending Enhanced Scripts™� platform so that the code will work equally well on MCC and child accounts, you can maintain multiple settings per account, easily maintain different settings different� accounts, and most importantly, all without ever touching a single line of code. If you can copy-and-paste, you can use our� Enhanced Scripts™ for AdWords.